LENEXA, KANSAS (September 19, 2019) — The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is now accepting nominations for the 2020 Green Chemistry Challenge Awards for companies or institutions that have developed a new process or product that helps protect public health and the environment.

LENEXA, KANSAS (September 10, 2019) — HyVee, a Des Moines-based supermarket chain, was recognized with three awards by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for their achievements in protecting the environment through noteworthy refrigerant-management. HyVee received a “Superior Goal Achievement” award for voluntarily setting and achieving their challenging corporate goal for reducing refrigerant-emissions.

WASHINGTON DC (August 29, 2019) — The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed updates to the prior administration’s national standards for the oil and natural-gas industry. The proposal would remove regulatory duplication and saves the industry millions of dollars in compliance-costs each year — while maintaining health and environmental regulations on oil and gas sources that the agency considers appropriate.

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is cautioning homeowners, manufacturers of propane-based refrigerants, home improvement contractors and air conditioning technicians of the safety hazards related to the use of pr...

(Kansas City, Kan., May 25, 2012) - The sunny days of spring and summer represent an entirely different dynamic for people in the Midwest.  While large numbers of people are heading for camp sites, parks and beaches that flourish throughout our region, it also means that the agriculture community - our farmers and ranchers - are hard at work in the fields and on rangeland. This means that the risk will increase for those spending more time in the sun.

 

Several agencies have designated Friday, May 25, 2012, as "Don't Fry Day" as a way to highlight sun safety. EPA has joined the National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and National Park Service (NPS) to emphasize the dangers of skin cancer and has provided simple steps Americans can take to protect themselves. The National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention designated the Friday before Memorial Day "Don't Fry Day" as a way to highlight sun safety.

Farmers and ranchers face a range of occupational hazards--from machinery accidents to chemical exposures from fertilizers and pesticides, to injuries from working with animals. A less-visible danger comes from the sun's ultraviolet rays, which can damage skin, leading to skin cancer, premature aging of the skin, and suppression of the immune system.

 

"Ultraviolet radiation is a serious threat to our health and especially to the health of those who make a living outside in the fields and on the rangeland in our region," EPA Region 7 Administrator Karl Brooks said. "The increased threat faced during the long and hot summer days of the heartland makes it imperative that we remember sun safety this summer."

 

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the U.S. and the most common cancer among 20 to 30 year-olds. It's estimated that one American dies every hour from melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. Approximately 76,000 new cases of melanoma will occur this year.

To help protect people's health, EPA's SunWise program, one of the nation's largest environmental and health education programs, encourages kids and their caregivers to practice safe sun habits and raises awareness about UV sunlight that penetrates the Earth's ozone layer.

Here are some tips to help Americans continue to exercise, get outside and be SunWise this Memorial Day weekend and throughout the summer:

Check the UV Index app: Check the ultraviolet (UV) index anytime by downloading EPA's app (epa.gov/enviro/mobile) to help plan outdoor activities in ways that prevent overexposure to the sun. UV rays from the sun (and from artificial light sources such as tanning beds) can lead to skin cancer.

Apply sunscreen and wear protective clothing: Apply a palm-full of sunscreen with SPF 15 or higher that provides broad-spectrum protection from both ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) rays to exposed skin about 15 minutes before heading outdoors. Reapply every two hours. Wearing protective clothing, a wide-brimmed hat, and sunglasses also prevents sun damage.

Seek shade, not sun: The sun's UV rays are strongest between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., so seek shade during this time.

Although less common in individuals with darker complexions, skin cancer does not discriminate and is more often fatal for individuals with darker skin. Overexposure to the sun also causes immune suppression and up to 90 percent of wrinkles, brown spots, leathering of the skin and sagging.

EPA's SunWise program offers factsheets online that have state-specific information (epa.gov/sunwise/statefacts.html ).

 

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EPA, FDA, NPS, National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention Highlight Sun Safety Tips for 'Don't Fry Day': May 25th

WASHINGTON - As summer quickly approaches, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has joined the National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and National Park Service (NPS) to emphasize the dangers of skin cancer and has provided simple steps Americans can take to protect themselves. The National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention designated the Friday before Memorial Day "Don't Fry Day" as a way to highlight sun safety.

"Skin cancer prevention and sun safety are important issues for EPA - our primary mission is to protect people's health and the environment," said Gina McCarthy, assistant administrator for EPA's Office of Air and Radiation. "While the agency has made steady progress protecting the Earth's ozone layer, the SunWise program and Don't Fry Day help teach children and families simple steps to stay safe in the sun and protect themselves from harmful UV rays."

"The risk of skin cancer is very real. It's therefore important that consumers prevent sunburn and protect themselves from the risk of skin cancer and early skin aging throughout the year," said FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg, M.D. "The FDA strongly recommends that consumers regularly use a Broad Spectrum sunscreen with an SPF value of 15 or higher in combination with other protective measures to more effectively protect themselves and their families whenever they are in the sun."

"Whether you hike or stroll, paddle a canoe or kayak or just sit in a mountain meadow watching the clouds go by, remember to put on your hat, apply sunscreen and have plenty of water to drink," said National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis. "These sun safety tips will protect your skin and I think guarantee that we'll see you often in your national parks."

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the U.S. and the most common cancer among 20 to 30 year-olds. It's estimated that one American dies every hour from melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. Approximately 76,000 new cases of melanoma will occur this year.

To help protect people's health, EPA's SunWise program, one of the nation's largest environmental and health education programs, encourages kids and their caregivers to practice safe sun habits and raises awareness about UV sunlight that penetrates the Earth's ozone layer.

Here are some tips to help Americans continue to exercise, get outside and be SunWise this Memorial Day weekend and throughout the summer:

Check the UV Index app: Check the ultraviolet (UV) index anytime by downloading EPA's app (epa.gov/enviro/mobile) to help plan outdoor activities in ways that prevent overexposure to the sun. UV rays from the sun (and from artificial light sources such as tanning beds) can lead to skin cancer.

Apply sunscreen and wear protective clothing: Apply a palm-full of sunscreen with SPF 15 or higher that provides broad-spectrum protection from both ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) rays to exposed skin about 15 minutes before heading outdoors. Reapply every two hours. Wearing protective clothing, a wide-brimmed hat, and sunglasses also prevents sun damage.

Seek shade, not sun: The sun's UV rays are strongest between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., so seek shade during this time.

Although less common in individuals with darker complexions, skin cancer does not discriminate and is more often fatal for individuals with darker skin. Overexposure to the sun also causes immune suppression and up to 90 percent of wrinkles, brown spots, leathering of the skin and sagging.

EPA's SunWise program offers factsheets online that have state-specific information (epa.gov/sunwise/statefacts.html). According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the states with the highest melanoma death rates include Nebraska, Vermont, Colorado, Kentucky, West Virginia, Oklahoma, and Idaho.

More on SunWise: http://www.epa.gov/sunwise

More on FDA sun safety: http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm258416.htm

More on NPS Healthy Parks Healthy People: http://www.nps.gov/public_health/hp/hphp.htm

More on CDC skin cancer prevention efforts: http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/skin/

The National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention social media opportunities: http://twibbon.com/cause/Don39t-Fry-Day-7/Join

(Kansas City, Kan., Nov. 1, 2011) - Anyone along the Mississippi River will see the steady-moving push boats moving along America's inland waterways, carrying commodities from as far north as St. Paul, Minn. to ports as far south as New Orleans, La.  Push boats run 24 hours a day, seven days a week moving goods to markets at inland ports along the river.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has announced a $494,978 grant to Southeast Missouri Regional Planning Commission (SEMO RPC) to replace engines on a push boat operated by SCF Marine.  The boat's old engines are from 1953 and 1960, decades before emission standards went into effect.  The new engines will meet EPA Tier II standards, resulting in reduced health impacts for port workers and communities along the Mississippi River.  The EPA grant is part of a $1 million project.

The Tier 2 vehicle and gasoline sulfur program is part of a series of major initiatives that reduce emissions from passenger vehicles, highway trucks and buses, and nonroad diesel equipment. The result will be reduced emissions, cleaner air, and improved human health.

SEMO RPC is also working with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources to reduce emissions on trash haulers and switch locomotives in southeast Missouri.

EPA has awarded $50 million for clean diesel projects as part of its ongoing campaign to reduce harmful emissions in the air and better protect people's health. These efforts will replace, retrofit or repower more than 8,000 older school buses, trucks, locomotives, vessels, and other diesel powered machines. Reducing emissions from existing diesels provides cost-effective public health and environmental benefits while supporting green jobs at manufacturers, dealerships and businesses across the country.

Diesel engines emit 7.3 million tons of smog-forming nitrogen oxides (NOx) and 333,000 tons of soot annually. Diesel pollution is linked to thousands of premature deaths, hundreds of thousands of asthma attacks and millions of lost work days. While EPA's standards significantly reduce emissions from newly manufactured engines, clean diesel projects funded through these grants will work to address the more than 11 million older diesel engines that continue to emit higher levels of harmful pollution.

 

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EPA Awards Almost $900,000 to University of Iowa Black Carbon Research

 

WASHINGTON - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has awarded more than $6.6 million in grants to eight universities in support of black carbon research. Black carbon is the sooty black material emitted from diesel-powered engines and vehicles, industries like brick kilns and coke ovens, traditional cookstoves, and other sources that burn fossil fuels or biomass. Black carbon can affect the climate in the near term, and like other types of fine particles, can cause serious health effects such as cardiovascular and respiratory ailments. Unlike greenhouse gases, which remain in the atmosphere for decades or centuries, black carbon particles only stay in the atmosphere for days or weeks. Therefore, reducing black carbon emissions could have a positive effect on our climate quickly.

 

"This research on black carbon will provide valuable information about the impact of black carbon on climate change," says William Sanders, director of EPA's National Center for Environmental Research. "An increased understanding of the impact black carbon has on climate change will better protect people and the environment."

 

EPA's Science to Achieve Results (STAR) program awarded nine grants to support research to study the role and effects of black carbon. The research will analyze the impacts of black carbon on air and water quality, investigate the behavior of black carbon aerosols in the atmosphere, and develop innovative tools such as computer models to look at black carbon deposits on snow. Black carbon deposited on snow and ice hastens melting by directly absorbing sunlight and by darkening the surface, which reduces the amount of light reflected back to space. The research also examines the aging of black carbon in the atmosphere.

 

Award recipients include the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Carnegie Mellon University; University of California, Irvine; University of California, Riverside; University of Iowa; University of Washington; University of Wisconsin-Madison; and Rutgers University.

 

More information on the black carbon research projects: www.epa.gov/ncer/blackcarbon

 

University of Iowa project team will receive $895,432 for their black carbon research project.

 

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(Kansas City, Kan., March 10, 2010) - Iowa has become the second state in the country to be federally authorized to administer and enforce the federal Lead-based Paint Renovation, Repair and Painting (RPP) program. Wisconsin was the first state to be certified.

The Renovation, Repair and Painting rule mandates training and certification in lead-safe work practices for construction contractors, property managers and others that work in homes and child-occupied facilities built before 1978. Governor Chet Culver has certified Iowa's program as it will be administered by the Iowa Department of Public Health.  States have to certify that their programs are at least as protective as EPA's and provide adequate enforcement.

"Iowa's proactive approach to prevent lead poisoning will allow Iowa citizens to be more aware of the dangers and protect children from lead-based paint hazards in their homes," said Regional Administrator Karl Brooks.

Effective April 22, 2010, anyone performing renovations or repairs for compensation must be trained and certified, and follow lead safe work practices.  Because lead-based paint in the home is a major cause of childhood lead poisoning, the RRP rule places new requirements on property management companies, landlords, contractors, renovators and painters for lead safe work practices to reduce the lead exposure of children.  

Common renovation activities like sanding, cutting and demolition can create hazardous lead dust and chips by disturbing lead-based paint, which can be harmful to adults and children. Lead-based paint was used in more than 38 million homes until it was banned for residential use in 1978.

Lead exposure can cause reduced IQ, learning disabilities, development delays and behavioral problems in young children.

Learn more about protecting your family from lead-based paint and EPA's lead program at http://www.epa.gov/lead or by contacting the National Lead Information Center at 800-424-LEAD (5323).

For more information about Iowa's new program, including information on applying for certification or training, contact the Iowa Bureau of Lead Poisoning Prevention at (515) 281-3479 or 1-800-972-2026, or visit the state Web site at  http://www.idph.state.ia.us/eh/lead_poisoning_prevention.asp .

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(Kansas City, Kan., March 10, 2010) - Beginning next month, federal law will require that contractors performing renovation, repair and painting projects that disturb paint in homes, child care facilities, and schools built before 1978 must be certified in the new EPA Renovation, Repair and Painting Rule (RRP) and follow specific work practices to reduce human exposures to lead.

Common renovation activities like sanding, cutting, and demolition can create hazardous dust and chips by disturbing lead-based paint, which can be harmful to adults and children. To protect against this risk, on April 22, 2008, EPA issued a rule requiring the use of lead-safe practices and other actions aimed at preventing lead poisoning. All contractors must be trained and certified by April 22, 2010.

Landlords, property managers, and their employees are responsible for ensuring compliance with the rule and play an important role in protecting public health by helping prevent lead exposure from their housing units.

Lead-based paint was used in more than 38 million homes until it was banned for residential use in 1978.

Lead exposure can cause reduced IQ, learning disabilities, developmental delays and behavioral problems in young children.

To locate an EPA-accredited training provider or to learn more about protecting your family from lead-based paint, visit EPA's Get Lead Safe web site, http://www.epa.gov/getleadsafe or contact the National Lead Information Center, 1-800-424-LEAD (5323).

For information about Iowa's certification and training program, contact the Iowa Bureau of Lead Poisoning Prevention, 515-281-3479 or 1-800-972-2026, or visit http://www.idph.state.ia.us/eh/lead_poisoning_prevention.asp.

For information about the Kansas certification and training program, contact the Kansas Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Prevention Program, 1-800-865-3233, or visit http://www.kshealthyhomes.org.

Missouri and Nebraska residents can locate an EPA-accredited training provider through EPA's Get Lead Safe web site, http://www.epa.gov/getleadsafe, or by calling the National Lead Information Center, 1-800-424-LEAD (5323). Information is also available from EPA Region 7 by calling 1-800-223-0425.


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For more information go to EPA's Get Lead Safe website:

http://www.epa.gov/getleadsafe