Annual reports show high quality water service from Iowa American Water

Davenport, Iowa (June 22, 2010) -- Iowa American Water's 2009 Consumer Confidence Reports indicate high water quality that  meets or surpasses all state and federal standards for all service areas, including Clinton and the Iowa Quad Cities where the company serves over 60,000 customers.  The company has just completed distribution of the annual water quality report as an insert in all customers' bills.

"We are pleased to report that the water supplied to our customers is of higher quality than required by state and federal drinking water standards," said Randy Moore, president of Iowa American Water. "Our team of water quality and plant operations professionals works hard every day to ensure the highest quality product for our customers. These results are a testament to their dedication."

The annual report measures the quality of Iowa American Water's drinking water to the state and federal quality standards established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Iowa Department of Natural Resources. The annual report details drinking water sources, testing conducted on the water, and substances detected in the water. Commonly asked questions and answers concerning drinking water are also included.

Customers who may have overlooked the report in their bill or who are not direct recipients of a water bill (e.g., renters) can request a copy by calling 1-866-641-2108. The reports are also available online at www.iowaamwater.com.

Iowa American Water

Iowa American Water, a wholly owned subsidiary of American Water (NYSE: AWK), is the largest investor-owned water utility in the state, providing high-quality and reliable water services to approximately 200,000 people.

Founded in 1886, American Water is the largest investor-owned U.S. water and wastewater utility company. With headquarters in Voorhees, N.J., the company employs more than 7,000 dedicated professionals who provide drinking water, wastewater and other related services to approximately 16 million people in 35 states, as well as Ontario and Manitoba, Canada. More information can be found by visiting www.amwater.com.

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Over $6,000 in grants awarded to three local projects

Davenport, Iowa (June 4, 2010) -- Iowa American Water announced today that three local watershed protection initiatives will receive funding through the company's 2010 Environmental Grant Program. The recipients will receive a share of grant funds totaling over $6,000 which the company earmarked for community-based projects that improve, restore or protect watersheds.
A panel of judges selected the winners from five grant applications which were evaluated on criteria such as environmental need, innovation, community engagement and sustainability. In a ceremony today, Iowa American Water awarded its 2010 Environmental Grants to:
  • Partners of Scott County Watersheds awarded $3,200 for its Infiltrate Iowa Project
  • Waste Commission of Scott County awarded $2,000 for its Operation Medicine Cabinet Program
  • Keep Scott County Beautiful, $1,000 for its Xstream Cleanup 2010

Iowa American Water also recognized Bettendorf student Pavane Gorrepati for a campaign she developed to increase environmental awareness locally and nationally, to inspire conservation efforts by young people, to promote sustainability and to advance environmental education. Gorrepati was presented with a special recognition award and gift certificate for her efforts.  Pavane is a student at Rivermont Collegiate.  She recently was recognized by the United States Environmental Protection Agency for her efforts at a ceremony in Washington, DC.

"The Environmental Grant Program has been very successful in helping local organizations carry out meaningful, sustainable initiatives that benefit our watersheds," said Randy Moore, president of Iowa American Water. "Again this year, the grant recipients along with the efforts by Pavane Gorrepati exemplify the type of environmental stewardship in which we are proud to partner to better protect our drinking water resources."
According to Clare Kerofsky, watershed coordinator for Partners of Scott County, "The funding received from Iowa American Water allows us to install practices that cleanse and reduce stormwater improving water quality and reducing flood levels and occurrences. The funding allows us to use the installation of the practices (soil quality restoration and rain gardens) as demonstration projects for developers, landscape contractors and residents promoting the installation of additional rain gardens and other infiltration practices."
The following describes the 2010 grant recipients' projects:
  • Partners of Scott County's Infiltrate Iowa Project will promote and install infiltration practices that improve water quality, reduce flooding and provide habitat for wildlife such as birds, butterflies and insects.
  • The Waste Commission of Scott County's Operation Medicine Cabinet program is a three-day event to collect pharmaceuticals free of charge from Scott County residents. The program will also educate the public that flushing pharmaceuticals poses a risk to our drinking water.
  • Keep Scott County Beautiful's Xstream Cleanup 2010 represents Chad Pregracke's Living Lands and Waters local annual cleanup of the Mississippi River and its tributaries. The effort aims to clean over 30 streams and near stream sites in the Quad Cities.
Established in 2007, Iowa American Water's Environmental Grant Program offers funds for innovative, community-based environmental projects in local communities served by American Water.  In 2010, American Water's Environmental Grant Program is providing grants totaling more than $128,000 to help support 32 projects in eight states.
Iowa American Water
Iowa American Water, a wholly owned subsidiary of American Water (NYSE: AWK), is the largest investor-owned water utility in the state, providing high-quality and reliable water services to approximately 200,000 people.
Founded in 1886, American Water is the largest investor-owned U.S. water and wastewater utility company. With headquarters in Voorhees, N.J., the company employs more than 7,000 dedicated professionals who provide drinking water, wastewater and other related services to approximately 16 million people in 35 states, as well as Ontario and Manitoba, Canada. More information can be found by visiting www.amwater.com.
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Annual water main and hydrant flushing program kicked off in the Iowa Quad Cities

DAVENPORT, IA (March 19, 2010) Iowa American Water kicked off its annual distribution system flushing in LeClaire earlier this week. The program will continue throughout the spring and summer months in all of the company's service communities, which include Davenport, Bettendorf, Riverdale and Panorama Park in the Iowa Quad Cities. Flushing will be conducted from 8 a.m. until 10 p.m. each week day. The company's Clinton District plans to flush its distribution system beginning in mid-April.

"The flushing program is designed to maintain a high quality of water in the distribution system by flushing or cleaning mineral deposits and sediment from water mains," said Randy Moore, president of Iowa American Water. "Over time, these sediments can build up in water mains causing discolored water and/or restricted flows.   As part of this program we will also inspect and operate fire hydrants to assure they are in good working order as well."

While no interruptions in water service will occur as a result of the work, Iowa American Water advises that when crews are flushing nearby, customers may experience a drop in water pressure or some discoloration of their water. Iowa American Water recommends that any customers experiencing discolored water let their cold water run to clear before using it again and refrain from doing laundry during that time.   Any water discoloration or low pressure problems should last only a short period of time.

In conjunction with the water main flushing, Iowa American Water is adjusting its treatment process for the next four weeks to prepare the distribution system for the on-going flushing.

From March 10 through April 19, the company is switching its disinfection method to a form of chlorine known as "free chlorine" which does not contain ammonia. Chlorine is commonly used in public water systems as a disinfectant and is monitored closely by our water quality experts to ensure optimum levels are present.

Due to the temporary change in the type of chlorine, customers may experience a more noticeable chlorine taste or odor in their tap water during the next four weeks.   There is no reason for concern. This is due to the switch in chlorine type only.

"The temporary switch in treatment is designed to make the routine flushing of water mains more effective and ensure we maintain our high quality water standards," Moore added.

If problems persist, notify Iowa American Water's customer service line toll free 24-hours a day at 1-866-641-2108.

The water main and hydrant flushing will be performed by Iowa American Water crews who will be working out of utility trucks labeled with the company logo.   All employees will also have photo ID badges.

Iowa American Water, a wholly owned subsidiary of American Water (NYSE: AWK), provides high-quality and reliable water and/or wastewater services to approximately 200,000 people. Founded in 1886, American Water is the largest investor-owned U.S. water and wastewater utility company. With headquarters in Voorhees, N.J., the company employs more than 7,000 dedicated professionals who provide drinking water, wastewater and other related services to approximately 15 million people in 32 states and Ontario, Canada. More information can be found by visiting www.amwater.com.

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DAVENPORT, IOWA (March 15, 2010) - Because minor water leaks account for more than one trillion gallons of water wasted each year in U.S. homes, EPA's WaterSense program has declared March 15 to 21, 2010 as "Fix a Leak Week" to remind Americans to check household plumbing fixtures and irrigation systems for leaks.
"Leaks can account for an average of 10,000 gallons of water wasted in the home every year, or enough to fill a backyard swimming pool," said Randy Moore, president of Iowa American Water. "By raising awareness in our partnership with the EPA WaterSense program, water conservation not only saves our customers money, but it also helps to preserve the environment and meet future water needs."
To help consumers across the country save water, the WaterSense program promotes ways to identify and repair dripping faucets, running toilets, and leaky showerheads. In most cases, fixture replacement parts can be installed by do-it-yourselfers and pay for themselves in no time.
Iowa American Water recommends the following tips to help save water lost by leaks:

 

  • Regularly check your toilet, faucets, and pipes for leaks. American Water offers leak detection kits, which are available by calling the American Water Customer Service Center at 1.866.641.2108 or in the Learning Center of the company's Web site, www.amwater.com. If you find a leak, have it fixed as soon as possible.
  • Reduce faucet leaks by checking faucet washers and gaskets for wear and replace them, or, if necessary, replace the faucet with a WaterSense labeled model.
  • Leaky toilets are most often the result of a worn toilet flapper. Replacing the rubber flapper is a quick fix that could save a home up to 200 gallons of water per day. Ask your water utility for a toilet leak detection kit, which will help you identify leaking commodes.
  • For a leaky garden hose, replace the nylon or rubber hose washer and ensure a tight connection to the spigot using pipe tape and a wrench.
  • Tighten connections on your showerheads if drips appear when the shower is off.
  • Check your garden and lawn irrigation system for leaks, or hire a certified WaterSense expert to check it for you.
If homeowners have to replace a plumbing fixture, EPA reminds them to look for the WaterSense label. WaterSense labeled toilets and faucets have been independently tested and certified to save water and perform as well as or better than standard models. WaterSense also partners with certified landscape irrigation auditors, designers, installers, and maintenance professionals with water-efficiency knowledge; see www.epa.gov/watersense to find a WaterSense irrigation partner in your area. For more information on Fix a Leak Week, visit www.epa.gov/watersense/fixaleak.
WaterSense is a partnership program sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to protect the future of our nation's water supply by promoting and enhancing the market for water-efficient products and services. WaterSense labeled products must achieve independent, third-party testing and certification to prove they meet EPA's criteria for efficiency and performance.

Company will switch to "free chlorine" treatment temporarily during its annual water main and hydrant flushing program.

DAVENPORT, IA (March 9, 2010) Iowa American Water will adjust its treatment process for the next five weeks as part of its regular, ongoing hydrant maintenance and flushing program.

From March 10 through April 19, the company will switch its disinfection method to a form of chlorine known as "free chlorine" which does not contain ammonia. Chlorine is commonly used in public water systems as a disinfectant and is monitored closely by our water quality experts to ensure optimum levels are present. However, due to the temporary change in the type of chlorine, customers mayexperiencea more noticeable chlorine taste or odor in their tap water during the next five weeks.   There is no reason for concern. This is due to the switch in chlorine type only.

"The temporary switch in treatment is designed to make the routine flushing of water mains more effective and ensure we maintain our high quality water standards," said Randy Moore, president of Iowa American Water.

The treatment change is being done in conjunction with the company's water main flushing program which will be ongoing this spring.

Flushing of the LeClaire, Iowa distribution system is scheduled to begin on March 15. The flushing will be conducted from 8 a.m. until 10 p.m. each day. In addition, flushing of the distribution system in Davenport and Bettendorf is continuing as well.

"The flushing program is designed to maintain a high quality of water in the distribution system by flushing or cleaning mineral deposits and sediment from water mains. Over time, these sediments can build up in water mains causing discolored water and/or restricted flows. As part of this program we will also inspect and operate fire hydrants to assure they are in good working order as well." Moore added.

While no interruptions in water service will occur as a result of the work, Iowa American Water advises that when crews are flushing nearby, customers may experience a drop in water pressure or some discoloration of their water. Iowa American Water recommends that any customers experiencing discolored water let their cold water run to clear before using it again and refrain from doing laundry during that time. Any water discoloration or low pressure problems should last only a short period of time.

If problems persist, notify Iowa American Water's customer service line toll free 24-hours a day at 1-866-641-2108.
The water main and hydrant flushing will be performed by Iowa American Water crews who will be working out of utility trucks labeled with the company logo. All employees will also have photo ID badges.

Iowa American Water, a wholly owned subsidiary of American Water (NYSE: AWK), provides high-quality and reliable water and/or wastewater services to approximately 200,000 people. Founded in 1886, American Water is the largest investor-owned U.S. water and wastewater utility company. With headquarters in Voorhees, N.J., the company employs more than 7,000 dedicated professionals who provide drinking water, wastewater and other related services to approximately 15 million people in 32 states and Ontario, Canada. More information can be found by visiting www.amwater.com.
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Final performances March 8 - 9 teach local students important water lessons

Davenport, Iowa. (March 8, 2010) - Iowa American Water and The National Theatre for Children, based in Minneapolis, Minnesota, are bringing the live theatrical show, "Alice in Water Land" to 12 local elementary schools in the Iowa Quad Cities. Final performances are scheduled at four local elementary schools on March 8 - 9. A schedule of performances dates/times and a program summary is included at the end of this release.

The presentations by the National Theatre for Children are part of Iowa American Water's youth education program. Iowa American Water has worked to enhance water education in area classrooms for decades by sponsoring an annual poster contest for over 20 years and sponsoring local Newspapers in Education "Water" and "Earth Day" issues. The Theatre for Children is an extension of that effort to bring water and conservation education to local elementary school students.

The National Theatre for Children, a Minnesota-based national touring company, works with corporations to relay their educational and public messages to students. Using simple sets and audience participation, the troupe will be presenting their program to hundreds of students in Iowa American Water's service areas throughout eastern Iowa. The shows share information on water education, water usage tips, and pollution control with students in a fun, interactive atmosphere.
About Iowa American Water Iowa American Water, a wholly owned subsidiary of American Water (NYSE: AWK), provides high-quality and reliable water and/or wastewater services to approximately 200,000 people. Founded in 1886, American Water is the largest investor-owned U.S. water and wastewater utility company. With headquarters in Voorhees, N.J., the company employs more than 7,000 dedicated professionals who provide drinking water, wastewater and other related services to approximately 15 million people in 32 states and Ontario, Canada. More information can be found by visiting www.amwater.com

Local students learn important water lessons March 2 - 9

Davenport, Iowa. (Feb. 26, 2010) - Iowa American Water and The National Theatre for Children, based in Minneapolis, Minnesota, are bringing the live theatrical show, "Alice in Water Land" to 11 local elementary schools in the Iowa Quad Cities March 2 - 9. A schedule of performances dates/times is included at the end of this release.
The presentations by the National Theatre for Children are part of Iowa American Water's youth education program. Iowa American Water has worked to enhance water education in area classrooms for decades by sponsoring an annual poster contest for over 20 years and sponsoring local Newspapers in Education "Water" and "Earth Day" issues.    The Theatre for Children is an extension of that effort to bring water and conservation education to local elementary school students.
The National Theatre for Children, a Minnesota-based national touring company, works with corporations to relay their educational and public messages to students. Using simple sets and audience participation, the troupe will be presenting their program to hundreds of students in Iowa American Water's service areas throughout eastern Iowa.  The shows share information on water education, water usage tips, and pollution control with students in a fun, interactive atmosphere.

About Iowa American Water 

Iowa American Water, a wholly owned subsidiary of American Water (NYSE: AWK), provides high-quality and reliable water and/or wastewater services to approximately 200,000 people. Founded in 1886, American Water is the largest investor-owned U.S. water and wastewater utility company. With headquarters in Voorhees, N.J., the company employs more than 7,000 dedicated professionals who provide drinking water, wastewater and other related services to approximately 15 million people in 32 states and Ontario, Canada. More information can be found by visiting www.amw.ater.com

Davenport, Iowa. (Feb. 23, 2010) - Iowa American Water is reminding residents to clear snow from fire hydrants. This winter's snow accumulation combined with the after-effects of plowing roads and parking lots have left many fire hydrants partially or completely buried in snow.
By keeping fire hydrants clear of snow, the public can help firefighters easily locate the fire hydrants in the event of an emergency and allow them to access water quickly, preserving valuable time to potentially save lives and structures. Iowa American Water annually inspects and maintains over 7,200 hydrants in Bettendorf, Davenport, Clinton, LeClaire, Panorama Park and Riverdale.

If you have a fire hydrant on or near your property, please take a few minutes to clear away the snow so it is visible in the event of an emergency. Remember, quick access to fire hydrants benefits everyone.

Iowa American Water, a wholly owned subsidiary of American Water (NYSE: AWK), provides high-quality and reliable water and/or wastewater services to approximately 200,000 people. Founded in 1886, American Water is the largest investor-owned U.S. water and wastewater utility company. With headquarters in Voorhees, N.J., the company employs more than 7,000 dedicated professionals who provide drinking water, wastewater and other related services to approximately 15 million people in 32 states and Ontario, Canada. More information can be found by visiting www.amwater.com.
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Davenport, Iowa (February 12, 2010) - Iowa American Water announced today that the application process is now open for its 2010 Environmental Grant Program to support innovative, community-based environmental projects that improve, restore or protect watersheds and community drinking water supplies.

The company will award grants of up to $5,000. The program is designed to support diverse types of activities, such as watershed cleanups, reforestation efforts, biodiversity projects, streamside buffer restoration projects, wellhead protection initiatives and hazardous waste collection efforts.

"The goal of this program is to positively impact watersheds and our drinking water resources," said Randy Moore, president, Iowa American Water. "We encourage municipalities, schools, environmental organizations and civic groups to apply for a grant to support projects that will benefit a watershed in their community."

To qualify, a proposed project must be located within an Iowa American Water service area and address a source water or watershed protection need in the community. All projects will be completed between May 1, 2010 and November 30, 2010. Criteria will be judged on the program innovation for the community, the partnership with other organizations and program sustainability.

In 2009, a total of 25 projects were supported by American Water environmental grants totaling more than $114,000. One of these projects was located in Iowa.

- River Action, Inc. of Davenport received a $3,300 grant to fund the Duck Creek Buffer Program. The program includes planting 30 feet of native grasses and forbs along Duck Creek's main stern and tributaries to improve water quality, provide habitat for wildlife, prevent erosion and sediment delivery, and encourage best stormwater management practices.

Grant information and application forms can be found online at www.iowaamwater.com. Applications must be postmarked by March 22, 2010, and mailed to Lisa Reisen at Iowa American Water, 5201 Grand Avenue, Davenport, Iowa, 52807 or emailed to lisa.reisen@amwater.com.

About Iowa American Water
Iowa American Water, a wholly owned subsidiary of American Water (NYSE: AWK), provides high-quality and reliable water and/or wastewater services to approximately 200,000 people. Founded in 1886, American Water is the largest investor-owned U.S. water and wastewater utility company. With headquarters in Voorhees, N.J., the company employs more than 7,000 dedicated professionals who provide drinking water, wastewater and other related services to approximately 15 million people in 32 states and Ontario, Canada. More information can be found by visiting www.amwater.com

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Naturally dissolved air in the water causes cloudy effect but no health problem

DAVENPORT, IA (Jan. 22, 2010)   It's that time of the year when Iowa American Water experiences one of its most common customer inquiries, "Why does my tap water sometimes appear cloudy or milky looking?" Iowa American's water quality professionals are quick to explain that cloudy or milky-looking water is not a health concern. Tiny air bubbles in the water can create a cloudy or milky appearance as the water is drawn from the tap.

"Cloudy or milky-looking" water, caused by dissolved air (oxygen), is not a health problem.   The phenomenon of cloudy water from the tap is similar to bubbles being released from a carbonated beverage when the cap is removed and pressure released," said Brent Earley, water quality supervisor for Iowa American Water. He adds that Iowa American Water provides its customers with water that is better than all Iowa Department of Natural Resources and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Safe Drinking Water Act regulations. There are no water quality regulations pertaining to dissolved oxygen in water because it does not present a health risk to people.

Dissolved oxygen in water is most evident during winter months when the water temperature is the coldest. Cold water dissolves more air out of the atmosphere than warm water. During the winter months, the temperature of the Mississippi River, Iowa American Water's source of supply in its Quad Cities District, drops as low as 32.5 degrees.   The water temperature does not increase significantly as it passes through the water treatment process, and the network of underground water mains, known as the distribution system. Since the water temperature remains cold as it travels from the treatment plant to the customer, it remains saturated with dissolved oxygen until it enters the customer's home or business.

When that cold water is drawn into the internal plumbing system of a home or building, it warms up to room temperature during extended periods of non-use or overnight.   This warmer water physically cannot hold as much dissolved air, but because the water is under pressure within the plumbing system's pipes, the excess dissolved air cannot escape until the water flows from the faucet.   The result is cloudy water when the faucet is initially turned on. Hot water from the water heater is typically cloudier than cold water.

"Customers can observe dissolved air (oxygen) escaping from a glass of water by holding the cloudy water up to a bright light or sunlit window and watching the water clear from the bottom of the glass up as the tiny air bubbles rise to the surface. The glass of water should clear in a minute or two," Earley added.   If the cloudy/milky water does not clear up within 1-2 minutes, please call Iowa American Water toll-free at 1-866-641-2108.

Customers with questions or concerns about their water quality should contact Iowa American's water quality experts or visit the company's web site at www.iowaamwater.com for general company information or a copy of the company's latest water quality report.

Iowa American Water, a wholly owned subsidiary of American Water (NYSE: AWK), provides high-quality and reliable water and/or wastewater services to approximately 200,000 people. Founded in 1886, American Water is the largest investor-owned U.S. water and wastewater utility company. With headquarters in Voorhees, N.J., the company employs more than 7,000 dedicated professionals who provide drinking water, wastewater and other related services to approximately 15 million people in 32 states and Ontario, Canada. More information can be found by visiting www.amwater.com.

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