The public is invited to join the Muscatine Art Center in welcoming Carol Ehlers, art history speaker, as she presents a 45 minute lecture on French Cubist painter Marie Laurencin. The lecture will take place Thursday, August 22 at 5:30 pm in the Muscatine Art Center's Music Room. Admission is free.

Marie Laurencin was born in Paris in 1883 and was an important figure in the Parisian avant-garde scene during the early years of the 20th century. She had close friendships with many fellow Cubists, including Pablo Picasso, George Braque, and Juan Gris and exhibited with them in 1910 and 1911. She became romantically involved with the poet Guillaume Apollinaire and is often identified as his muse.

When Laurencin divorced from her German-born husband in 1920, she returned to Paris from Germany. There she achieved financial success as an artist until the depression of the 1930's. During the Depression she worked as an art instructor at a private school. She taught and continued to paint until her death in 1956.

Marie Laurencin is admired first and foremost for her charming sense of color and style which makes her paintings immediately recognizable. Her works, which included oil paintings and pastels, watercolors, drawings, and prints, remained remarkably consistent throughout her career. She is known as one of the few female Cubists and although she worked closely with other members of the movement, she developed a unique approach to the subject of abstraction. Her use of pastels and curved, feminine forms kept her body of work outside the norms of Cubism.

In 1992 the Muscatine Art Center's collections were significantly enriched by a gift of twenty-seven works of art by Toulouse-Lautrec, Matisse, Degas, Boudin, Chagall, Renoir, and other European artists. The collection was a gift from the estate of Mary Musser Gilmore in honor of her parents, Richard Drew Musser and Sarah Walker Musser. The paintings are on permanent display in the Laura Musser Mansion.

 

EVENT DETAILS:

Lecture: French Cubist Marie Laurencin

Who: Carol Ehlers

When: Thursday, August 22, 2013

Time: 5:30 PM

Where: The Muscatine Art Center's Music Room

Admission to this program is FREE.

 

Please contact Katy Loos, Program Coordinator, with any questions or concerns at

563-263-8282 or by email at kloos@muscatineiowa.gov.

 

The Muscatine Art Center is located at 1314 Mulberry Avenue in Muscatine, Iowa. Hours are Tuesday through Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Thursday evenings until 7:00 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from 1:00 to 5:00 p.m. Admission is free. Donations are appreciated. Visit www.muscatineartcenter.org for more information about programs and events and to download a class brochure.  
JULY 16, 2013

The public is invited to join the Muscatine Art Center in welcoming Carol Ehlers, art history speaker, as she presents a 45 minute lecture on Impressionism and its influence on 19th Century modernity and fashion. The lecture will take place Thursday, July 25 at 5:30 pm in the Muscatine Art Center's Music Room. Admission is free.

From the mid-1860's to the 1880's, Paris was emerging as the style capital of the world, just when the artists who called themselves the Impressionists gained notoriety within the artistic community. The Impressionists, with their love of movement, color and light, and contemporary life, set out to capture modern life in its elemental form. This "snapshot" of society included all the nuances of the day; most specifically the fashions and trends of the time.

The mid-1880's saw the rise of the department store and the increasing presence of the fashion magazine- a possible reflection upon the pastimes of the bourgeoning society in Paris, from the operatic and yachting scenes to views of the Siene River. The Impressionists were keen to represent the sordid underworld of the glitzy Paris above, often depicting women in the cabarets dancing the Can-Can and the Bolero, with their ruffled skirts and plumed hairpieces, as well as the patrons in raggedy clothes in back rooms of the taverns sipping Absinthe. Their clothing, though not as opulent as those who frequented the ballets (another favorite subject of the Impressionists, most notably Edgar Degas), nonetheless reflected the ever changing fashion of the day.

Impressionism, Fashion, and Modernity is the name of the world-traveled exhibit that has now made its way to its final stop at the Art Institute of Chicago, after having been realized at the Musée d'Orsay in Paris and traveled to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.
After having visited the exhibit in Chicago, our speaker Carol Ehlers will use the exhibit in Chicago as a starting point to her discussion about the French Impressionists and their influence on modern society and fashion in mid-19th century Paris.

In 1992 the Muscatine Art Center's collections were significantly enriched by a gift of twenty-seven works of art by Toulouse-Lautrec, Matisse, Degas, Boudin, Chagall, Renoir, and other European artists. The collection was a gift from the estate of Mary Musser Gilmore in honor of her parents, Richard Drew Musser and Sarah Walker Musser. The paintings are on permanent display in the Laura Musser Mansion.

MUSCATINE ART CENTER

1314 Mulberry Avenue, Muscatine, IA 52761    563-263-8282

www.muscatineartcenter.org

Due to the storm damage incurred on Monday afternoon, the Muscatine Art Center will be closed today, Tuesday, June 25th. There are branches and unsecured bricks that pose potential risk. Tree removal will begin today. Only those who have official business at the Art Center should use the Cedar Street parking lot, and call the office at 563-263-8282 to gain access to the building. All others are strongly discouraged from coming onto the grounds of the Art Center.

Damage to the Musser house and portions of the Art Center is not significant. Art Center staff and other City of Muscatine departments are making every effort to ensure that the Ice Cream Social, scheduled for Sunday, June 30th, will go ahead as planned.

Concerned citizens who wish to volunteer with clean up can contact United Way of Muscatine. Nichole Sorgenfrey, United Way's Program Manager, will take a list of those interested in helping. She can be reached at 563-263-5963. The exact timing of when volunteers are needed is uncertain at this time.

A follow up press release will be sent in a few days to confirm that the Ice Cream Social will go ahead as planned. Updates will also be posted on the Art Center's website and facebook page.

The Muscatine Art Center is located at 1314 Mulberry Avenue in Muscatine, Iowa. Hours are Tuesday through Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Thursday evenings until 7:00 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from 1:00 to 5:00 p.m. Admission is free. Donations are appreciated.

Contact Melanie Alexander at 563-263-8282 or malexander@muscatineiowa.gov.

June 30th - July 4th

Color in PatriART Week with Red, White & Blue

MUSCATINE, Iowa

"Chalk-the-Walk" is one of several new events added to this year's PatriART week. The 7th annual PatriART week is a celebration of Muscatine's art, history, and culture culminating with the fireworks display on July 4th.  All events are free and fun for the whole family.

PatriART week kicks off on Sunday, June 30th with a family bike ride departing from Discovery Park at 1 p.m. Participants will stop by the Muscatine Art Center for tasty treats at the Friends of the Muscatine Art Center's Annual Ice Cream Social. The Ice Cream Social will be held from 1 to 5 p.m. Highlights include live music, a book sale, an art fair, "fun with fruit", kids games, and family activities. The Muscatine Art Center will also hold a dedication of the E. Bradford Burns Performing Arts Park at 1 p.m.

One of the new events, Chalk-the-Walk, will be held on Monday, July 1st from 5 p.m. to dusk on the riverfront in the parking lot by the Riverview Center. During the event, kids are encouraged to use sidewalk chalk to color in cartoon characters recreated by Flynn Collier and other local artists. Chalk is provided by the Muscatine Art Center. The Muscatine Civil War Roundtable will also present the lecture, "Muscatine & Vicksburg" on July 1st at 6:30 p.m. inside the Riverview Center.

Tuesday, July 2nd features two events - the opening of the exhibit, "Rollin' on the River," a collection of Oscar Grossheim's photographs of the Mississippi River and Concert Night at Weed Park. The exhibition is sponsored by the Musser Public Library and River's Edge Gallery. The reception is from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. at River's Edge Gallery, 216 W. Third Street. The exhibition will be on view at River's Edge Gallery throughout the month of July. Concert Night at Weed Park begins at 7 p.m. in the band shell with a performance by "Fun with Brass". Following the band's one hour performance, the Muscatine Civic Chorale will take the stage.

Noon on Wednesday, July 3rd brings the return of music on the lawn of City Hall. Mayor Hopkins has arranged for the "Vineyard Café After Hours" band to play. Residents of Muscatine will not want to miss this as Mayor Hopkins will take a seat behind the drums. Later in the day, families will want to catch all of the activities at Discovery Park for Family Night. The Environmental Learning Center will open a new temporary exhibition about snakes and let kids get up close with the slithery creatures. Friends of the Old Barn will offer tours and crafts from salvaged wood. The Friends of the Pine Creek Grist Mill will provide hands-on demonstrations and exhibits. Family Night will be from 5 to 8 p.m. with Grave Witching, a method for locating unmarked graves, offered from 6 to 7 p.m. in the Muscatine County Home Cemetery in Discovery Park.

The week wraps up with activities on July 4th. The Fourth of July Parade begins at 5:00 p.m. in downtown Muscatine. At 8 p.m., the Muscatine Symphony Orchestra will perform. The fireworks at dusk will mark the finale of the week's activities.

Schedule:

Sunday, June 30

Family Bike Ride (1-2 p.m.)

Meet at Discovery Park and depart at 1 p.m. for a family bike ride of either 3 or 10 miles. Both rides stop at the Muscatine Art Center for free ice cream. Participants who decorate their bike will also receive a coupon for another sweet treat.

Contact: Greg Harper (563) 263-4043/ greg@harperscycling.com

Ice Cream Social (1-5 p.m.)

Come to the Muscatine Art Center to enjoy ice cream, assorted desserts, family friendly fun, and live music. This year there will also be an art fair and the dedication of the E. Bradford Burns performing Arts Park at 1 p.m.

Contact: Melanie Alexander (563) 263-8282/ Melanie@muscatineiowa.gov


Monday, July 1

Chalk-the-Walk

Bring the family to the Riverfront where local artist, Flynn Collier will outline cartoon characters for kids to color in with chalk. Activities will take place on the riverfront in the parking lot of the Riverview Center. Chalk is provided.

Contact: Melanie Alexander (563) 263-8282/Melanie@muscatineiowa.gov

Muscatine Civil War Roundtable's "Muscatine & Vicksburg" (6:30 p.m.)

Listen to this exciting lecture at the Riverview Center.

Contact: Dan Clark (563)264-5990 /dclark@muscanet.com


Tuesday, July 2

Opening Reception for ""Rollin' on the River," Oscar Grossheim's photographs of the Mississippi River from the Collection of the Musser Public Library

Exhibition and Reception at River's Edge Gallery, 216 W 3rd Street, from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m.

Contact: Pam Collins at Musser Public Library - (563)263-3065/ Pcollins@muscatineiowa.gov or Joel Smyers at River's Edge Gallery - (563)263-3176

Concert Night (7-9 p.m.)

Fun with Brass and Muscatine Civic Chorale at Weed Park Band Shell

Contact: Fun with Brass - Carolyn Airola (563) 264-2071/ amcjairola@gmail.com, Muscatine Civic Chorale: Jan Phillips-  jphillips@eicc.edu


Wednesday, July 3

Concert on the Lawn of City Hall (12 p.m.)

"Vineyard Café After Hours" Band

Contact: Mayor Hopkins (563)264-1550

Discovery Park Family Night (5-8 p.m.)

Learn about snakes when the Environmental Center opens its traveling exhibit on snakes - Contact: Curt Weiss (563) 264-5922/ cweiss@co.muscatine.ia.us

Old Barn Tours and Crafts- Contact: David Metz (563) 263-4222/ davemetz@machlink.com

Hands on Demonstration and Exhibits of the Friends of the Pine Creek Grist Mill-Contact: Tom Hanifan tomhanifan@yahoo.com


Thursday, July 4

4th of July Parade (5 p.m.) - Contact: GMCCI (563) 263-8895

Muscatine Symphony Orchestra (8 p.m.) On the Pearl City Station's West Patio -Contact: Carolyn Airola (563) 264-2071/ amcjairola@gmail.com

Fireworks (Dusk)- Contact: GMCCI (563) 263-8895

The Muscatine Art Center will open its latest exhibition, "A Journey Down River: Celebrating the 75th Anniversary of the Great River Road" on Sunday, June 30th as part of the Friends of the Muscatine Art Center's Annual Ice Cream Social. The exhibition will be on display in the Stanley Gallery through October 27, 2013.

The Mississippi River has always served as a muse for artists, songwriters and authors. "Old Man" River has been described as mighty, muddy and wicked, but the word "spectacular" describes both the river itself and the Muscatine Art Center's collection of works depicting the river. The collection includes paintings, drawings, prints and maps which historically and aesthetically document the river and the communities built along its banks.

The Great River Road, which travels the length of both sides of the Mississippi River, is celebrating its 75th anniversary this year. In 1938, the Mississippi River Parkway Commission (MRPC) was established for the purpose of collectively preserving, promoting and enhancing the scenic, historic and recreational resources of the Mississippi River.

The Muscatine Art Center exhibition will follow the Great River Road as part of the anniversary celebration. Highlights from the River Collection include a variety of works by Henry Lewis, an oil on pressed wood by Sally MacMillan, a painting by Muscatine's own William Bunn, a lithograph by John Page, a view of "Bloomington" (Muscatine) by John Casper Wild, prints by Karl Bodmer, hand colored engravings by Herrmann Meyer and a pen and ink drawing by Rudolf Cronau.

As a compliment to the River Collection, the Art Center has on display the speedboat racing trophies of Charles (Chap) Hanley. Hanley was born in Muscatine in 1878 and raced his first boat in 1904, eventually becoming a national champion. He set the world's speed record in 1923 and won trophy after trophy with the boats that he often designed and built himself.

The Muscatine Art Center is located at 1314 Mulberry Avenue in Muscatine, Iowa. Hours are Tuesday through Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Thursday evenings until 7:00 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from 1:00 to 5:00 p.m. Admission is free. Donations are appreciated.

"View of the Mississippi from Wyoming Hill" by William Bunn, 1946 Collection of the Muscatine Art Center, Gift of the Raymond Titus Estate.jpg

The public is invited to join the Muscatine Art Center in welcoming Carol Ehlers, art history speaker, as she presents a 45 minute lecture on the art of French artist Raoul Dufy. The lecture will take place Thursday May 23 at 5:30 pm in the Muscatine Art Center's Music Room. Admission is free.

Raoul Dufy was a French painter who made his mark on the 20th Century as he helped to create a modern visual sensibility and perception. His cheerful oils and watercolors depict events of the time period, including yachting scenes, sparkling views of the French Riviera, chic parties, and musical events.

Born in Le Havre near Normandy, France in June 1877, Dufy soon showed some rare talent for drawing. To make money for his family, he left school at the age of fourteen to work in a coffee-importing company, but took art classes in the evening. At the age of 18, he started taking evening classes in art at Le Havre's municipal art school. During this period, Dufy painted mostly Norman landscapes in watercolors after being influenced by the Impressionists such as Claude Monet and Camille Pissarro.

From 1904-1905, fascinated by a painting by Henri Matisse, Dufy turned to Fauvism. The Fauves emphasized bright color and bold contours in their work. He then discovered the work of Paul Cézanne which led him to adopt a somewhat subtler technique. Still he only adhered to the Fauve movement during three years until 1909 after finding that he needed to instill more austerity and soberness in his works, thus his movement into Cubism. His true personality started to blossom though the public was not immediately receptive to his works.

In 1913, his painting Le Jardin abandonné (The abandoned garden) contained the early signs of what made Dufy's work so original: the dissociation of color and drawing. Dufy felt that colors had their own lives, going beyond the object, giving structure to his paintings. By 1950, his hands were struck with rheumatoid arthritis and his ability to paint diminished. Dufy died in France, in March 1953, and was buried near Matisse in Cimiez, France.

In 1992 the Muscatine Art Center's collections were significantly enriched by a gift of twenty-seven works of art by Toulouse-Lautrec, Matisse, Degas, Boudin, Chagall, Renoir, and other European artists. The collection was a gift from the estate of Mary Musser Gilmore in honor of her parents, Richard Drew Musser and Sarah Walker Musser. The paintings are on permanent display in the Laura Musser Mansion.

FOR RELEASE: MAY 2, 2013

The Muscatine Art Center holds tens of thousands of objects in its collection. Like many museums, only a small percentage - as little as one percent - of the collection is on view at any given time.

On Thursday, May 9, 2013, the Muscatine Art Center will offer behind-the-scenes tours for those interested in seeing the storage area and learning how the staff documents, cares for and manages the collection. Two rounds of tours will be offered. The first tour is from 4 to 5:15 p.m., and the second from 5:30 to 6:45 p.m. Space is limited to 12 people per tour, and registration is taken on first come, first served basis.

Don't miss this opportunity to see stored treasures from the Art Center's permanent collection. Join a tour group for a truly unique experience as you hear about how the museum operates from the inside out and have your individual questions answered by staff.

HIGHLIGHTS:

  • Rarely seen "cool stuff" from the Art Center - art objects and artifacts that tell fascinating stories about Muscatine and/or the region.
  • Main collection storage areas and hidden storage areas in the Musser Museum.
  • Textile and print storage.
  • The original Musser Carriage House and Musser Museum basement.
  • Explanation of how museums keep track of collections.

BOOKING INFORMATION:

  • Tours are limited to a maximum of 12 people. Please indicate the tour time you would like to be a part of.
  • Tours are for adults and children over 12 years of age (12-16 year olds need to be accompanied by an adult).
  • Tour duration is approximately 1 hour and 15 minutes.
  • As a courtesy to other participants, please be on time.
  • Physical accessibility is somewhat limited with the full behind-the-scenes tour including narrow stairs. Please notify us at the time of booking of any special requirements.
  • For security reasons, you may not take mobile phones, cameras, videos, other electrical equipment, bags, food or drinks on the tour. All personal items must be checked before the tour departs.

Call NOW to reserve a place in the Muscatine Art Center's Behind-the-Scenesexperience!

EVENT DETAILS:

What: Muscatine Art Center's Behind-the-Scenes Tour

Who: Hosted by MAC staff

When: Thursday, May 9, 2013

Times: 4:00-5:15 and 5:30-6:45 PM

Where: The Muscatine Art Center

Admission to these tours is FREE.

Please contact Katy Doherty, Program Coordinator, with any questions or concerns at

563-263-8282 or by email at kdoherty@muscatineiowa.gov.

The Muscatine Art Center is located at 1314 Mulberry Avenue in Muscatine, Iowa. Hours are Tuesday through Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Thursday evenings until 7:00 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from 1:00 to 5:00 p.m. Admission is free. Donations are appreciated. Go to www.muscatineartcenter.org for more information about programs and events and to download a class brochure.

 

 

 

The Muscatine Art Center will feature one of Muscatine's own in the upcoming exhibition, "Jon Fasanelli-Cawelti: A Retrospective." The exhibition of the printmaker's works will open on May 5 and run through June 9, 2013.

As a twenty-one year resident of Muscatine, Fasanelli-Cawelti is known to many local residents through his artwork, trumpet playing in groups such as the Muscatine Symphony Orchestra and the Mad Creek Mudcats, as a former instructor at Muscatine Community College, through his involvement in the Kosovo Project in 2005 and 2008 and through simple encounters in everyday life.

Originally a student of history, Fasanelli-Cawelti studied briefly at the Art Institute of Chicago before acting on his father's suggestion of studying art at the University of Iowa where he learned from Virginia Myers and obtained his BFA in 1983. Fasanelli-Cawelti received his MFA from the University of Iowa in 1985 and was a student of Mauricio Lasansky, who was once referred to by Time Magazine as "the nation's most influential printmaker." Fasanelli-Cawelti was personal assistant and printer for Lasansky from 1985 to 1998. His relationship to the Lasansky family continues. Fasanelli-Cawelti printed works for Tomas Lasansky's monograph, Icons and Muses, in 2008 and exhibited prints alongside Richie Lasansky. Tomas is Lasansky's
son, and Richie is his grandson.

Fasanelli-Cawelti is an accomplished printmaker and artist in his own right and his work often features the people, places and objects, especially musical instruments, which are woven into his daily routines. His technique of intaglio printing dates back to the 1400s but Fasanelli-Cawelti has found innovative ways to present a traditional technique. Viewers to the exhibition will see the progression of his work from early prints that are objective and in black and white to recent pieces that are abstract and sometimes feature vibrant color and woven strips of paper.

Fasanelli-Cawelti's printmaking has evolved since having discovered seven years ago that he has a progressive, motor-neuron disorder. In a way, he credits the disorder with "liberating" his work from being "strictly objective." Having accepted that he may not be able to physically achieve the same level of precision, some of Fasanelli-Cawelti's recent prints have built-in allowances such as printing on woven paper which is then re-aligned to create a different image.

Fasanelli-Cawelti is pushing boundaries - the boundaries of traditional printmaking, the boundaries of his own style and the boundaries of his physical capabilities. The process of creating a plate, preparing materials for printing - Fasanelli-Cawelti makes his own ink, and physically running the print is demanding. Yet Fasanelli-Cawelti did not shy away from creating a seven-foot tall print of Diana Calzaretta, his wife of 30 years. This print, which was created in January 2013, will be on public view for the first time during the retrospective at the Muscatine Art Center.

The exhibition, "Jon Fasanelli-Cawelti: A Retrospective," offers a look at the technique of printmaking and the evolution of a printmaker. The opening on May 5th will feature Fasanelli-Cawelti's other passion, playing trumpet, with a performance by the Mad Creek Mudcats from 1 to 2:30 p.m. The reception will be held from 1 to 4 p.m. The public is invited to attend. Admission is free.

The Muscatine Art Center is located at 1314 Mulberry Avenue in Muscatine, Iowa. Hours are Tuesday through Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Thursday evenings until 7:00 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from 1:00 to 5:00 p.m. Admission is free. Donations are appreciated.
APRIL 22, 2013

The public is invited to join the Muscatine Art Center in welcoming Carol Ehlers, art history speaker, as she presents a 45 minute lecture on the art of French Neo-Impressionist Paul Signac. The lecture will take place Thursday, April 25 at 5:30 pm in the Muscatine Art Center's Music Room. Admission is free.

Paul Signac was born in Paris on November 11, 1863 to a well to do family and grew up in the cultural district of Montmartre. By the age of 18, Signac studied architecture before deciding to pursue a career as a painter after attending an exhibit of Claude Monet's work. He chose to be an Impressionist painter because of his liking for Monet, the outdoors, originality, and independence.  He had no formal art instruction but devoted himself to the study of the works of Manet, Monet, Degas, and Caillebotte.

In 1884 Signac met Georges Seurat at the first Société des Artistes Indépendants and was struck by Seurat's meticulous methods. By 1885, under Seurat's influence, he abandoned the short brushstrokes of impressionism to experiment with scientifically juxtaposed small dots of pure color based on the laws of color theory established by the chemist Eugène Chevreul. These dots were intended to combine and in the viewer's eye, the defining feature of pointillism, a branch of Neo-Impressionism that Seurat and Signac successfully coined.

By 1892, he moved from Paris to St Tropez, and he was painting almost entirely in his studio from sketches and watercolors originally made in front of the scenes he found in the course of his travels. As an avid sailor, he went on a number of cruises, which took him to various ports in France, Italy, Holland and Constantinople.

Signac was president of the Société des Artistes Indépendants from 1908 until his death at age seventy-two in 1935. He encouraged the next generation of young artists by exhibiting their controversial works. He inspired Henri Matisse and André Derain in particular, thus playing a decisive role in the evolution of the Fauvist movement.

In 1992 the Muscatine Art Center's collections were significantly enriched by a gift of twenty-seven works of art by Toulouse-Lautrec, Matisse, Degas, Boudin, Chagall, Renoir, and other European artists. The collection was a gift from the estate of Mary Musser Gilmore in honor of her parents, Richard Drew Musser and Sarah Walker Musser. The paintings are on permanent display in the Laura Musser Mansion.

 

EVENT DETAILS:

Lecture: Paul Signac: Scientific Theory and Pointillism

Who: Carol Ehlers

When: Thursday, April 25 2013

Time: 5:30 PM

Where: The Muscatine Art Center's Music Room

Admission to this program is FREE.

 

Please contact Katy Doherty, Program Coordinator, with any questions or concerns at

563-263-8282 or by email at kdoherty@muscatineiowa.gov.

 

The Muscatine Art Center is open to the public Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday from 10 AM to 5 PM, Thursday from 10 AM to 7 PM and Saturday and Sunday from 1 to 5 PM Admission is FREE.

April 19, 2013

The Friends of the Muscatine Art Center invites the public on a bus trip to the Art Institute of Chicago for the Picasso and Chicago exhibition.

The Art Institute of Chicago has a special connection to Picasso and it was the first art museum in the United States to exhibit the young artist's work at the 1913 Armory Show. The Picasso and Chicago exhibition celebrates the 100-year relationship between the artist and Chicago by bringing together over 250 of the finest examples of the Picasso's paintings, sculpture, prints, drawings, and ceramics. Included in the exhibition are pieces from the Art Institute's collection as well as loans from private collections to create the first large-scale Picasso exhibition organized by the museum in almost 30 years.

The Friends' trip is set for Thursday, May 9th with boarding at 6:45 a.m. from the soccer complex on Houser Street and arriving back in Muscatine at 7:00 p.m. The cost for the trip is $85 for non-members and $75 for members of Friends of the Muscatine Art Center. Cost includes round trip transportation and a ticket to the exhibition. The bus is to arrive in Chicago at 10:30 a.m., and the group is free to visit the museum and exhibition and lunch on their own. The bus departs Chicago at 3:30 p.m.

Reservations must be made and paid by Tuesday, April 23, 2013. For reservations call 563-263-8282. Please make checks payable to Friends of the Muscatine Art Center.

Pages