National Security Advisor John Bolton became the latest American casualty of Washington's 18-year war in Afghanistan on September 10, fired by US president Donald Trump shortly after Trump announced that he had planned, but was canceling, a meeting with Taliban leaders at Camp David to ink a "peace deal."

Andrew Yang's small-but-solid polling in the Democratic Party's 2020 nomination race shows that "Universal Basic Income" has gone from a fringe idea to an idea with a foothold in the popular consciousness.

Supporters of a basic income span the political spectrum and the economic upheavals of the 21st century — especially fears that automation will increasingly replace human workers — are likely to fuel its journey to the center of policy discussions over the next few years.

If at first you don't succeed, spread some money around. The Financial Times reports that the US State Department is offering cash bribes to captains of Iranian ships if they sail those ships into ports where the US government can seize them.

More than a year out from the 2020 presidential election, we're already starting to see "spoiler" fear-mongering from supporters of America's two largest political parties and their candidates.

Will formerly Republican congressman Justin Amash of Michigan run for president as a Libertarian or independent in 2020?

How about formerly Republican, formerly Democrat, formerly independent, former Rhode Island governor and US Senator, now Wyoming Libertarian Lincoln Chafee?

The US Department of Homeland Security's Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), the New York Times reports, fears "ransomware" attacks against America's voter-registration systems in the run-up to the 2020 presidential election. In response, it's launching a program that "narrowly focuses" on protecting those systems.

Just over a year ago, Michael Drejka fatally shot Markeis McGlockton in a Clearwater, Florida convenience store parking lot. On August 23, a jury found Drejka guilty of manslaughter.

Drejka should never have been charged with a crime.

President Donald Trump faces an exceedingly-narrow path to re-election in 2020. In order to beat him, the Democratic nominee only needs to pick up 38 electoral votes. With more than 100 electoral votes in play in states that Trump won narrowly in 2016 — especially Wisconsin, Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Florida — all the Democrats have to do is pick a nominee ever so slightly more popular than Hillary Clinton.

In 2004, Democratic presidential nominee John Kerry called his ever-shifting position on the war in Iraq "nuanced" as a way of explaining why he was for it before he was against it and why his prescriptions for its future kept changing.

"Nuance" pops up frequently in debates on politics and public policy, almost always as an excuse for either non-specificity on a current position or flip-flopping from a past position.

On August 12, the Trump administration announced new rules for immigrants seeking permanent-residence status (through issuance of a "green card")  in the United States. Those rules apply a longstanding prohibition on immigrants likely to become "public charges" (that is, dependent on government benefits) to applicants who have received certain of those government benefits — among them Medicaid, SNAP ("food stamps"), and housing assistance — for more than 12 months.

On the morning of August 10, a wealthy sex-crimes defendant was reportedly found dead in his cell at New York's Metropolitan Correctional Center.

"New York City's chief medical examiner," the New York Times reported on August 11, "is confident Jeffrey Epstein died by hanging himself in the jail cell where he was being held without bail on sex-trafficking charges, but is awaiting more information before releasing her determination ..."

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