"Walmart Inc will stop selling e-cigarettes in its US locations as the country grapples with a string of vaping-related deaths," Bloomberg reports.

CNN: "Walmart said Friday [September 20] it will stop selling e-cigarettes as the number of deaths tied to vaping grows."

Associated Press: "Walmart said Friday that it will stop selling electronic-cigarettes at its namesake stores and Sam's Clubs following a string of mysterious illnesses and deaths related to vaping."

The US Navy confirms that three online videos showing two military air-encounters with what it calls "unexplained aerial phenomena," and the rest of us call "unidentified flying objects," are authentic, Popular Mechanics reports.

The videos are interesting, and some might find them disturbing. What's more disturbing to me is that the Navy thinks they're none of our business 15, or even four, years later (the incidents occurred in 2004 and 2015).

On September 14, US president Donald Trump tweeted (of course) the suggestion of a US-Israel "Mutual Defense Treaty," citing a call with Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

Hopefully there's less going on here than meets the eye: The tweet may just be another mutual publicity back-scratch of the type Trump and Netanyahu frequently exchange when they find themselves in political pickles. And Netanyahu is likely in the biggest such pickle of his career.

"Imagine what would be possible right now with ideas that are bold enough to meet the challenges of our time, but big enough, as well, that they could unify the American people [like the 9/11 attacks did]," said South Bend, Indian mayor Pete Buttigieg in his opening statement at the September 12 Democratic presidential nomination debate. "That's what presidential leadership can do. That's what the presidency is for."

National Security Advisor John Bolton became the latest American casualty of Washington's 18-year war in Afghanistan on September 10, fired by US president Donald Trump shortly after Trump announced that he had planned, but was canceling, a meeting with Taliban leaders at Camp David to ink a "peace deal."

Andrew Yang's small-but-solid polling in the Democratic Party's 2020 nomination race shows that "Universal Basic Income" has gone from a fringe idea to an idea with a foothold in the popular consciousness.

Supporters of a basic income span the political spectrum and the economic upheavals of the 21st century — especially fears that automation will increasingly replace human workers — are likely to fuel its journey to the center of policy discussions over the next few years.

If at first you don't succeed, spread some money around. The Financial Times reports that the US State Department is offering cash bribes to captains of Iranian ships if they sail those ships into ports where the US government can seize them.

More than a year out from the 2020 presidential election, we're already starting to see "spoiler" fear-mongering from supporters of America's two largest political parties and their candidates.

Will formerly Republican congressman Justin Amash of Michigan run for president as a Libertarian or independent in 2020?

How about formerly Republican, formerly Democrat, formerly independent, former Rhode Island governor and US Senator, now Wyoming Libertarian Lincoln Chafee?

The US Department of Homeland Security's Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), the New York Times reports, fears "ransomware" attacks against America's voter-registration systems in the run-up to the 2020 presidential election. In response, it's launching a program that "narrowly focuses" on protecting those systems.

Just over a year ago, Michael Drejka fatally shot Markeis McGlockton in a Clearwater, Florida convenience store parking lot. On August 23, a jury found Drejka guilty of manslaughter.

Drejka should never have been charged with a crime.

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