On April 18, US Attorney William Barr released Special Counsel Robert Mueller's report on the probe into "Russian meddling" in the 2016 presidential election. The report cleared President Donald Trump and his campaign team of allegations that they conspired with the Russian government in that meddling. But on the question of "obstruction of justice," Mueller punted in an eerily-familiar way.

I haven't read the Mueller report yet. I'm writing this on the day of its release (with redactions) by US Attorney General William Barr. I'll read it later, but I didn't have to read it, or even wait for its release, to reach one conclusion from it: It's time to amend the Constitution to limit the President of the United States to one term.

Because I'm both a Libertarian and a loudmouth, I'm frequently hit with questions about libertarianism (and the Libertarian Party). Recently this one came up:

"What is the most controversial belief of Libertarians?"

Could it be our support of immigration-freedom (and, generally, freedom to travel)?

Or our demand for separation of school and state?

Perhaps our hard-line support for gun rights?

Or our stand for legalization of all drugs?

On April 11, the ongoing saga of journalist and transparency activist Julian Assange took a dangerous turn.  Ecuador's president, Lenin Moreno, revoked his asylum in that country's London embassy.

"Congressional Democrats and Republicans," reports ProPublica, "are moving to permanently bar the IRS from creating a free electronic tax-filing system."

A February Harris poll finds that 49.6% of Millennial and Generation Z Americans would "prefer living in a socialist country."

US Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT) and US Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY), among other politicians, proclaim a message of "democratic socialism," evoking an ideology last ascendant in the early 1900s when Eugene Debs and Norman Thomas moved the needle in US elections.

Governor Andrew Cuomo "insisted Monday (April 1) that New York will pass a law to legalize recreational pot before the Legislature adjourns in June," The New York Post reports. He's been promising legalization for some time. Many New Yorkers had hoped the measure would be included in this year's state budget.

In a recent column on the mating dance between Big Government and Big Tech, I noted that "Big Tech wants to be regulated by Big Governments because regulation makes it more difficult and expensive for new competitors to enter the market."

Two days after I hit "publish" on that column, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg called for government regulation of social media in a Washington Post op-ed.

Governments around the world began trying to bring the Internet under control as soon as they realized the danger to their power represented by unfettered public access to, and exchange of, information. From attempts to suppress strong encryption technology to the Communications Decency Act in the US and China's "Great Firewall," such efforts have generally proven ineffectual. But things are changing, and not for the better.

On February 7, Senator Ed Markey (D-MA) and Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) released the text of a joint resolution calling for a "Green New Deal."

Fine, said Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY). Let's vote on it in the Senate.

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