US president Donald Trump "elevated his political interest above the national interest and demanded foreign interference in an American election," Peter Beinart asserts at The Atlantic. "What's received less attention is what the scandal reveals about Joe Biden: He showed poor judgment because his staff shielded him from hard truths. If that sounds faintly familiar, it's because that same tendency underlay Hillary Clinton's email woes in 2016."

"Wasting resources, capital, and income on stuff nobody really needs," Charles Hugh Smith wrote in 2017, "is a monumental disaster on multiple fronts. Rather than establish incentives to conserve and invest wisely, our system glorifies waste and the destruction of income and capital, as if burning time, capital, resources, and wealth on stuff nobody needs is strengthening the economy."

"If the facts are your side," famed attorney and former law professor Alan Dershowitz instructed his students, "pound the facts into the table. If the law is on your side, pound the law into the table. If neither the facts nor the law are on your side, pound the table."

As Republican attacks on the US House of Representatives' impeachment inquiry grow in fury, they more and more resemble the third instruction in Dershowitz's maxim.

The US House of Representatives soberly fulfills its constitutional obligation to investigate alleged wrongdoing by a sitting president, steadily building its case for that president's impeachment.

The Deep State schemes to remove a sitting president, trumping up (pun intended) supposed "high crimes and misdemeanors" and gaming a faux-constitutional "impeachment probe" to deny that president due process to which he's entitled.

On November 4, ten dual US-Mexican citizens — members of an offshoot sect of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints — died in a highway ambush, apparently the latest casualties of rampant and violent drug-cartel activity in northern Mexico.

US president Donald Trump promptly called upon "Mexico, with the help of the United States, to wage WAR on the drug cartels and wipe them off the face of the earth. We merely await a call from your great new president!"

Politicians lie.

Not all of them. Not every time. But most of them, from both "major" political parties, lie. A lot.

It's not always easy to tell when they're lying. It's not always easy to prove they're lying. Often, it's not even easy to tell if they're just lying to us or to themselves as well.

When US president Donald Trump announced his plan to relocate a few dozen US soldiers in Syria — getting them out of the way of a pending Turkish invasion — the Washington establishment exploded in rage at what it mis-characterized as a US "withdrawal" from Syria.

Instead of fighting that mis-characterization, Trump embraced it, pretending that an actual withdrawal was in progress and announcing on October 9 that "we're bringing our folks back home. "

Every time a witness testifies behind closed doors in the US House of Representatives' methodical march toward the impeachment of President Donald Trump, Trump supporters scream "no quid pro quo" while Trump opponents breathlessly inform us that the "smoking gun" has turned up and that impeachment is now "inevitable."

"Let's tell the truth," said Walter Mondale as he accepted the Democratic Party's 1984 presidential nomination. "It must be done, it must be done. Mr Reagan will raise taxes, and so will I. He won't tell you. I just did."

That comment looms large in popular memory as the cause of Mondale's crushing defeat that November. Of 50 states, he carried only one, his home state of Minnesota, polling only 40.6% of votes nationwide to Ronald Reagan's 58.8%.

"I'm not making any predictions, but I think [the Russians] have got their eye on somebody who is currently in the Democratic primary and are grooming her to be the third-party candidate," said Hillary Clinton on her former campaign manager's podcast. "They know they can't win without a third party candidate."

Was Clinton referring to US Representative Tulsi Gabbard, CNN asked? "If the nesting doll fits," her spokesperson replied.

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