Protests quickly broke out nationwide following the May 25 killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, which was caught on video and quickly went viral.

Yes, Chauvin has been arrested and charged with murder.

Yes, the usual "voices of reason" are issuing a new round of calls for "police reform," just as they do after every police murder of an unarmed, non-violent civilian.

On May 28, US president Donald Trump signed an executive order on "Preventing Online Censorship." From the title and the document respectively we can draw to two lessons.

First: Never, ever, ever believe the title of a government document. The internal texts of congressional bills and resolutions, as well as executive branch orders, "findings," intelligence "estimates," etc. seldom have much, if anything, to do with their titles.

In mid-May, the US House of Representatives passed a resolution authorizing remote voting by proxy. Per the resolution, one congressperson may vote on behalf of up to ten others. In theory,  as few as 40 of the House's 435 members could show up in Washington for the House to do business.

As the COVID-19 pandemic ran its deadly course in New York, governor Andrew Cuomo affirmed a state policy forbidding nursing homes to reject suffering from the disease. At least partially as a result (Cuomo himself acknowledged early on that the virus spreads through such facilities "like fire through dry grass"), nearly 6,000 long-term care residents have died so far.

When US president Donald Trump mentioned that he's taking hydroxychloroquine, he immediately got an extra dose of flak from both the mainstream media and noted medical experts such as US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA). Trump has been using the drug prophylactically versus COVID-19 — which he's likely been exposed to via a personal valet — with the concurrence of his physician.

On May 15, city officials declared Atwater, California, a "sanctuary city." Not for undocumented immigrants, but for businesses and churches who choose to ignore Governor Gavin Newsom's COVID-19-related shutdown orders. The city won't be enforcing the governor's edicts. Those edicts, Mayor Paul Creighton told local businesses, are "between you and the state of California."

"I fear that many Americans will resist getting vaccinated against the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus," Dr. Lauren S. Grossman writes at Stat. "To put this scourge behind us, I believe that our nation should, for the first time ever, require all Americans — or at least schoolchildren and workers in direct-contact jobs — to be vaccinated against this coronavirus."

One laudable side effect of the COVID-19 panic is a nationwide effort to promote "vote by mail" as a universal alternative to standing in line at polling places. One reason that effort is laudable is that it would likely decrease vote-fraud. Yes, I said "decrease." And Republicans were saying the same thing until recently.

On May 3, a group of around 60 mercenaries attempted an amphibious landing at Macuto, on Venezuela's Caribbean coast. They were quickly defeated and 13 of them — including two Americans, Airan Berry and Luke Denman — captured. US president Donald Trump has denied any association with, knowledge of, or involvement in the affair on the part of the US government.

Writing at Reason magazine, Eric Boehm notes two trends revealed in data released by Apple and Foursquare. Trend One: Americans began reducing their outings and social interactions before, not because of, "shelter in place" orders issued by grandstanding, opportunistic politicians. Trend  Two: Americans started coming back out and resuming something like normal life before, not because, those politicians started lifting those orders.

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