As the US House of Representatives took up the Affordable Care Act, aka "ObamaCare," in 2010, then-Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) famously told her fellow members of Congress "we have to pass the bill so that you can find out what is in it."

On August 5, US Representative Joaquin Castro (D-TX) posted an infographic to Twitter naming and shaming his city's most generous supporters of President Donald Trump's re-election campaign: "Sad to see so many San Antonians as 2019 maximum donors to Donald Trump .... Their contributions are fueling a campaign of hate that labels Hispanic immigrants as 'invaders.'"

Condemnations quickly followed.

Donald Trump Jr compared the tweet to the Dayton, Ohio killer's "hit list."

"Online communities like 4chan and 8chan have become hotbeds of white nationalist activity," wrote the editors of the New York Times  on August 4 in the wake of a mass shooting in El Paso, Texas. Then: "Law enforcement currently offers few answers as to how to contain these communities."

Wait, what? Is the Times really implying what it looks like they're implying? Yes.

America, John Quincy Adams said in 1821, "goes not abroad, in search of monsters to destroy. She is the well-wisher to the freedom and independence of all. She is the champion and vindicator only of her own." That's as good a summary ever spoken of the non-interventionist position.

US Senator Lindsey Graham (R-SC) disagrees. He opposes President Trump's quest for a peace agreement with the Taliban in Afghanistan as "reckless and dangerous," entailing "severe risk to the homeland."

On July 25, US Attorney General William Barr ordered the Federal Bureau of Prisons to update its execution protocol and schedule five executions starting this December.

Whether you support the death penalty or not — I don't because I prefer limited government and the power to kill disarmed prisoners in cold blood and with premeditation is by definition unlimited government — it's worthwhile to ask: Why? More to the point, why now?

Politics, that's why.

On July 23, the US House of Representatives passed (the vote went 398-17, with five voting "present") a resolution condemning the Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions (BDS) Movement.

The resolution was an outrageous condemnation of the freely-chosen economic actions of millions of Americans.

Multi-millionaire Jeffrey Epstein stands accused of sex trafficking and conspiracy to traffic minors for sex. On July 18, US District Court judge Richard Berman denied bail, ordering that Epstein be confined until trial.

The US Constitution's Eighth Amendment is short and sweet: "Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted."

The controversy around President Donald Trump's recent tweets targeting "The Squad" — four Democratic members of Congress who are all women, all people "of color," and all of whom Trump seems to think aren't "from America" (one came from Somalia as a young woman and became a US citizen at 17; the rest are "natural born" US citizens) — largely centers around perceptions of his personal bigotry.

Claiming to speak for "we the people," the framers of the US Constitution offered it as a tool to "form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity."

As of July 23, members of the United Kingdom's Conservative Party will have chosen a new leader. On July 24, Queen Elizabeth II will appoint a new prime minister, almost certainly that new party leader. The two remaining contenders for those jobs are former Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson and current Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt.

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