The controversy around President Donald Trump's recent tweets targeting "The Squad" — four Democratic members of Congress who are all women, all people "of color," and all of whom Trump seems to think aren't "from America" (one came from Somalia as a young woman and became a US citizen at 17; the rest are "natural born" US citizens) — largely centers around perceptions of his personal bigotry.

Claiming to speak for "we the people," the framers of the US Constitution offered it as a tool to "form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity."

As of July 23, members of the United Kingdom's Conservative Party will have chosen a new leader. On July 24, Queen Elizabeth II will appoint a new prime minister, almost certainly that new party leader. The two remaining contenders for those jobs are former Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson and current Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt.

"Here we go with the Fake Polls," President Donald Trump tweeted on July 15. "Just like what happened with the Election against Crooked Hillary Clinton." He's complaining about several polls that show him losing the national popular vote to various Democratic presidential aspirants, in some cases by double-digits. He has a point. In 2016, most polls showed Hillary Clinton winning handily and most Americans seem surprised when Trump emerged victorious.

It's hard to believe we need to have this conversation in this day and age. But if we don't keep having it, at some point we might not be allowed to have it. Question: What is free speech? Or, rather what is NOT free speech?

In 2008, billionaire asset manager Jeffrey Epstein's lawyers negotiated a very favorable plea bargain in Florida, under which he served a mere 13 months in jail — in his own private wing, with 12 hours of daily "work release" — on a single charge of soliciting prostitution from a minor (the FBI had identified 40 alleged victims of sexual predation on his part).

In mid-May, San Francisco, California became the first American city to ban use of facial-recognition surveillance-technology by its police department and other city agencies. That's a wise and ethical policy, as a July 7 piece at the Washington Post proves.

Self-help guru Marianne Williamson isn't likely to win the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination, despite having probably served the American public more ably than any of her opponents. (Among other things, her Project Angel Food delivers millions of meals to the seriously ill). Good works aside, she's a little too "New Age," spiritual, and individualist/voluntarist-oriented for a population increasingly viewing coercive government as its living and unquestionable God.

As President Donald Trump met with Supreme Leader Kim Jong-un for the third time at the end of June — becoming the first sitting US president to visit North Korea — the New York Times ran a piece suggesting the appearance of a new option on the proverbial  table: A negotiated "nuclear freeze" rather than just another cycle of fruitless US demands for  "de-nuclearization."

In the wake of her supposed "victory" in the first round of Democratic presidential debates, US Senator Kamala Harris rose from fifth place to a tie for third place (with fellow US Sen Elizabeth Warren) in a Morning Consult poll of her party's primary voters. Her gain came mainly at the expense of  the front-runner, former vice-president Joe Biden. More interesting than Harris's sudden ascent is how she managed it: By ripping a page out of Donald Trump's 2016 campaign playbook.

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