For a "progressive" presidential candidate, US Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) is remarkably, well, conservative. Her proposals are neither new nor of the "democratic socialist" variety. In fact, her aim is, as Matthew Yglesias puts it at Vox, "to save capitalism" with stock-proposals from the first-half of the last century.

One of the 21st century's greatest heroines is behind bars again, held in contempt by federal judge Claude M Hilton for refusing to help prosecutors trump up charges against the journalists who published information she paid dearly for giving them.

In the first week of March, big retail chains announced more than 1,100 planned store-closings. That, writes Hayley Peterson at Insider, brings the number of planned US store-closings for 2019 to more than 5,300.

The Retail Apocalypse is here, and it has consequences. Including, reports Krystal Hu for Yahoo! Finance, 41,000 retail jobs cut in January and February.

The word of the month for the Democratic Party's would-be 2020 presidential nominees is "aspirational."

"The Green New Deal? I see it as aspirational," US Senator Amy Klobuchar told Fox News on February 12. She would vote for the resolution introduced by US Rep Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Senator Ed Markey, but "if it got down to the nitty-gritty of an actual legislation, as opposed to, 'Oh, here's some goals we have' — uh, that would be different for me."

The Boston Globe's Naomi Martin and James Pindell report that all of 2020's formally declared "major party" presidential candidates say they support legalizing marijuana at the federal level. Yes, that includes President Trump.

Great idea! But why should the nearly 2/3 of Americans who want marijuana legalized spend the next 20 months listening to these candidates promise to make it happen? At least eight of them are in a position to get the job done now.

The US Department of Defense wants to retire an old aircraft carrier early while building two new ones (and adding other goodies to their shopping list).

Surprise, surprise — politicians from states with the shipyards and naval bases that employ their constituents want to keep the old carrier AND build the new ones.

By the time you read this column, the US House of Representatives will almost certainly have passed the following Joint Resolution:

"Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That, pursuant to section 202 of the National Emergencies Act (50 USC 1622), the national emergency declared by the finding of the President on February 15, 2019, in Proclamation 8444 (84 Fed Reg 4949) is here-by terminated."

As February draws to an end, rumors abound that we're about to see Special Counsel Robert Mueller's report on alleged Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. Or at least that someone — namely, newly confirmed US Attorney General William Barr — is about to see that report. The rest of us, maybe not so much.

US president Donald Trump recently declared a "national emergency" under which he intends to divert money from the US Department of Defense's budget and use it to build a wall on the US-Mexico border.

No biggie, Trump said as he announced the "emergency." Happens all the time (59 other times since 1976, to be exact). Purely routine.

Washington's political establishment went berserk when US Representative Ilhan Omar (D-MN) publicly noted that US-Israel relations are "all about the Benjamins" — slang for $100 bills, referring to money shoveled at American politicians by the American Israel Public Affairs Group (AIPAC).

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