Washington, D.C. - Senator Tom Harkin (D-IA) today issued the following statement in honor of the 47th anniversary of the signing of the Equal Pay Act on June 10, 1963.  Harkin is a cosponsor of the Paycheck Fairness Act, which would strengthen penalties for discrimination, and has introduced the Fair Pay Act, which would require employers to provide equal pay for equivalent jobs and disclose pay scales and rates for all job categories at a given company.  This legislation would give women the information they need to identify and fight discriminatory pay practices.  Harkin is the Chairman of the Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee.

"Nearly half a century after the Equal Pay Act was signed into law, far too many women in this country still do not get paid what men do for the exact same work.  On average, women make only 77 cents for each dollar a man makes.  The circumstances are even worse for Latinas and women of color.  Due to this injustice, women lose an estimated $700,000 over the course of their lifetimes due to unequal pay practices.  This inequality means real hardship for women and their families.

"Unfortunately, there are too many loopholes and too many barriers to effective enforcement of existing laws. That is why I strongly support the Paycheck Fairness Act. This bill would strengthen penalties for discrimination and give women the tools they need to identify and confront unfair treatment.  I hope that the Senate can pass the bill and send it to the President's desk this year.

"In addition, we must recognize that the problem of unequal pay goes beyond insidious discrimination. To address this more subtle discrimination, I have introduced the Fair Pay Act to ensure that employers provide equal pay for jobs that are equivalent in skill, effort, responsibility and working conditions.

"As we observe this anniversary, we must take the necessary steps to end discrimination.  We can start by closing the pay gap and simply paying women fairly."

Generates $6 Billion in Savings: $4 Billion for Deficit Reduction, $2 Billion for Critical Farm Bill Programs While Improving Critical Farm Safety Net Program

WASHINGTON, June 10, 2010 - As part of the Administration's continuing efforts to reform the Federal crop insurance program, reduce the Federal deficit, and maximize taxpayer dollars, USDA today released the final draft of a new crop insurance agreement and announced that $6 billion in savings has been created through this action. Two thirds of this savings will go toward paying down the federal deficit, and the remaining third will support high priority risk management and conservation programs. By containing program costs, these changes will also ensure the sustainability of the crop insurance program for America's farmers and ranchers for years to come.

USDA's Risk Management Agency (RMA), which administers the Federal crop insurance program, today released the final draft version of a new Standard Reinsurance Agreement (SRA), which details the new terms, roles, and responsibilities for both the USDA and insurance companies that participate in the Federal crop insurance program.

"The Federal crop insurance program is a critical component of the farm safety net, and now that our negotiations are complete, we have the framework for a stronger program that will help producers in every region of the country better manage their risk," said Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack. "The President has laid out an aggressive plan for reducing the deficit and we're pleased to take a leadership role in that effort with today's announcement while strengthening key risk management and conservation programs that benefit America's farmers and ranchers."

The release of the final draft agreement follows two draft proposals and months of discussions with insurance companies and other stakeholders. USDA has worked aggressively through the negotiation process to preserve the crop insurance program as part of the farm safety net, support producer access to critical risk management tools, protect the interests of taxpayers, and ensure a reasonable return for the companies that deliver the program.

The final draft agreement will generally maintain the current Administrative and Operating (A&O) subsidy structure, but remove the possibility of windfall government payments based on high commodity price spikes by limiting the level of A&O payments that the industry can receive. However, an inflation factor and consideration for new business is included so that the maximum payment may reasonably increase over the length of the agreement.

Through this negotiation process, RMA has lowered the projected average long-term return for the companies to about 14.5 percent. To do this, RMA worked closely with the insurance companies to modify the terms under which RMA provides reinsurance. Meanwhile, RMA will increase the return in historically underserved states to provide additional financial incentives for companies to write business in these states. The agency also returned to individual state stop loss protection for the more risky business, thus providing greater reinsurance protection for companies.

Through USDA's work during this negotiation process, the Administration is also ensuring that $2 billion in savings from the new Standard Reinsurance Agreement will be used to strengthen successful, targeted risk management and conservation programs and that $4 billion will be used to reduce the national deficit. The $2 billion that will be invested in Farm Bill programs include releasing approved risk management products, such as the expansion of the Pasture, Rangeland, and Forage program; providing a performance discount or refund, which will reduce the cost of crop insurance for certain producers; increasing Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) acreage to the maximum authorized level; investing in new and amended Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program initiatives; and investing in CRP monitoring.

The $4 billion in budget savings USDA achieved is one of the first and most significant steps that a federal agency has achieved in reducing mandatory spending from the long term federal deficit.

The 2008 Farm Bill authorized RMA to renegotiate the agreement effective for the 2011 crop year. Due to significant increases in commodity prices in recent years, annual insurance industry payments more than doubled from $1.8 billion in 2006 to an estimated $3.8 billion in 2009 based on the terms of the previous SRA. Meanwhile, the number of total policies decreased from 2000 to 2009.

In preparation for these negotiations, RMA contracted with an internationally known company, Milliman Inc., to review historical rates of return and determine a reasonable rate of return for the crop insurance industry. The Milliman analysis shows that over the past 21 years, the crop insurance companies averaged a 17.0 percent return when the average reasonable rate for that period was 12.7 percent. See the full report and additional information about the new SRA online at http://www.rma.usda.gov/news/2009/12/sra.html.

Since the renegotiation process launched, USDA has focused on six primary objectives for this agreement, which have been maintained throughout the negotiation process:

1) Maintain producer access to critical risk management tools;

2) Align A&O subsidy paid to insurance companies closer to actual delivery costs;

3) Provide a reasonable rate of return to insurance companies;

4) Protect producers from higher costs while equalizing reinsurance performance across states to more effectively reach under-served producers, commodities, and areas;

5) Simplify provisions to make the SRA more understandable and transparent; and

6) Enhance program integrity.

These objectives align with RMA's primary mission to help producers manage the significant risks associated with agriculture. By achieving these six objectives, the new SRA ensures financial stability for the program and the producers it serves, while increasing the availability and effectiveness of the program for more producers and making the program more transparent. Following today's delivery of the final draft to the companies, RMA will work with the companies to correct any technical errors or unclear language.

###

Opening Statement of Sen. Chuck Grassley

as Prepared for Delivery

Hearing, "The U.S. - China Economic Relationship: A New Approach for A New China"

Secretary of the Treasury Timothy F. Geithner, testifying

Thursday, June 10, 2010

Today's hearing provides an opportunity for the Committee to engage Secretary Geithner on the outcome of last month's Strategic and Economic Dialogue in Beijing.

I have serious concerns about the direction that China's government is taking with respect to its economic and trade policies.

I want to hear from the Secretary specifically what these meetings accomplished, and what the Secretary sees in the way of next steps in our bilateral relationship.

For example, what are China's intentions with regard to its currency exchange rate?

I emphatically disagreed with the Treasury Department's decision in April to delay issuance of its currency report.

The time is long past for the Treasury Department to admit publicly what everyone else already knows?namely, that China is manipulating the value of its currency in order to gain an unfair advantage in international trade.

Treasury obviously felt differently, and I'd like to hear what this delay in issuing the report has accomplished.

I worry that, by delaying the report, Treasury has raised expectations that won't be met.  Is the Chinese government going to make a significant adjustment to its exchange rate, just because our Treasury Department held off on issuing this report?  I doubt it.

I also want to hear about the Secretary's discussions regarding China's so-called indigenous innovation policy, which is a government policy to give preferences in China's procurement market to products that contain intellectual property developed in China.

Our Ambassador to the World Trade Organization has described this policy as one of several Chinese policies indicating, quote, "a policy direction that seems designed to limit market access for imports and foreign investors and pressure enterprises to localize research and development in China, as well as transfer technologies," end quote.

In other words, instead of doing everything it can to comply with the letter and spirit of its World Trade Organization obligations, the Chinese government appears to be looking for ways to evade those rules, or to find loopholes and gaps in the rules that it can exploit.

This is a troubling development that, in my view, calls for some careful rethinking about our overall approach to China on trade matters.

For example, if China continues to refuse to make a serious offer to join the Government Procurement Agreement in the World Trade Organization, we should take a harder look at our own procurement rules as they apply to the procurement of goods and services from China.

Separately, if China chooses to apply a "national economic security" test when it reviews foreign investment through mergers and acquisitions, perhaps we should do the same with respect to Chinese investments in the United States.

The point is, if one of the major beneficiaries of the world trading system engages in a pattern of refusing to play by the same rules as everyone else, then we should reconsider the rules that we apply to that country.

I look forward to hearing from the Secretary his intentions for prompt action to address these important issues.



The following area students have made honors at their respective colleges and universities for the Spring of 2010:

Nicholas Stephen Ehrecke, Bettendorf, Margaret Alyson Schutte, Davenport, and Kaela Elizabeth Swarts, Davenport have all made the Provost's List at Truman University in Kirksville, Missouri.

Julie Marie Hasken, Andrew Keith Piotter and Andy Wang Yang, all of Bettendorf, and Aubrey Ann Crowley of Davenport have made the President's List at Truman University in Kirksville, Missouri.

Marquette University, Milwaukee, announces that Anna Aquino of Bettendorf, Kevan Kadavy of Davenport, and Tara Vandygriff of Rock Island have all made the university's Dean's List.

Dana College, Blair, Nebraska announced that Kasey McCreary, a sophomore from Davenport, has made the Dean's List.

Kirkwood Community College has released its Dean's List for the Spring 2010 Semester. These students have achieved a 3.3 grade point average or higher after completing 12 or more credit hours with the college.  Kirkwood students from the area earning this distinction include :

  • Elizabeth A. Beasley, Amy L. Berg, Brendan R. Bishop, Quinn C. Claussen, Christopher S. Cotton, Robert A. Harmon, Jr., Cody R. Nicely-Green, Ben J. Palczynski, Allen A. Seitz and Miranda R. Wymore, all of Bettendorf.
  • Chase Cartee, Colin A. Cartee, Ramsay A. Dibbern, Luci Dynes, Angela M. Eckert, Alexander J. Kish, Ryan S. Kitzmann, Mary C. Meincke, John M. O'Donnell, Timothy P. O'Leary, Alexander J. Shipman, Troy M. Stalder, Thuong T. Tran, James M. Wiebler, and Matthew R. Wilford, all of Davenport;
  • Betsey M. Baker, Mark A. Krismanits, Nicholas D. Loehr and Barbara J. Nichols all of Moline.
  • Taylor A. Hilmo of Rock Island.

 

Nicholas Hunt of Bettendorf  made the Dean's List for spring semester 2010 at the Georgia Institute of Technology (aka Georgia Tech) in Atlanta.

Iowa Wesleyan College, Mt. Pleasant, Announces the following students have made the Spring Dean's List:

  • Meredith Frasier of Moline 
  • Travis Parker of Taylor Ridge
  • Jenny Rich of Davenport

Central College, Pella, Iowa, has announced the following Dean's List recipients:

  • Patricia Braun, freshman from Davenport
  • Jessica Emard, sophomore from Bettendorf
  • Kelsey Howard, sophomore, from Davenport
  • Maaike Mielenhausen, freshman from Davenport
  • Anthony Miller, junior from Davenport
  • Alissa Olson, senior from Rock Island
  • Kelly Spavin, freshman from Pleasant Valley

Ottawa University, Ottawa, Kansas, has announced that Elizabeth A. Wilkens of Davenport has made the Dean's Honor List.

Grand View University, Des Moines, Iowa, has announced the following honors recipients:

  • Katelyn Christine Carlson of Rock Island has made the Dean's List
  • Deanna Keira Carr of Davenport has made the President's List.
  • Brittany Marie Erps of Davenport has made the Dean's List
  • Ashlee Marie Martin of Davenport has made the Dean's List

Beloit College, Beloit, Wisconsin, has announced that Marlo A. Buzzell and Grace E. Darmour-Paul, both seniors from Davenport, have made the Dean's List.



CLIVE, Iowa -- American Prosthetics & Orthotics, a full service provider of custom prostheses and orthoses, has relocated its Davenport office. The new office is located at 1351 West Central Park Avenue, Suite 450, in Genesis Medical Center West, part of the Genesis Hospital Medical complex.  The telephone number for appointments will remain the same, (563) 324-7707. Andy Besser, CPO, is branch manager.

APO has been providing quality care to Iowa and the surrounding states for almost half a century.  Its ABC-certified practitioners continue a tradition of meeting patients' individual needs and goals through innovative solutions and quality workmanship.  They design and fit comfortable and highly functional prostheses for amputees as well as custom fabricate and fit a wide range of orthotic support systems for fractures, diabetic feet, spinal and cervical disorders, neuromuscular conditions, and sport injuries.

APO has patient care offices in Bettendorf, Clive, Davenport, Des Moines, Iowa City, West Burlington, and also in Moline, Illinois.

For more information on APO and its services, call (515) 224-0537 or visit www.apoinc.com.

 

###

It is that time of year again when days become longer and nights become shorter, and when the beautiful summer weather calls everyone to enjoy the sun's rays.  Simply being outdoors during the summer months can be quite a pleasure.  But it is also important to take precautions when heading outdoors.

For those with fair skin, being over-exposed to the sun's ultraviolet rays can have harmful effects.  In fact, one in five of us will develop skin cancer in our lifetimes, making it the most common form of cancer in the country.  And as the years go on, this number has only been rising.

But skin isn't the only victim. Long-term exposure to UV rays can also cause immune system suppression and premature aging.

In particular, we need to encourage the young people in our lives to take precautions.  Most Americans receive 50 to 80 percent of their lifetime sun exposure before they reach the age of 18.  Just one or two blistering sunburns in childhood may double the risk of developing melanoma.

Getting some sun exposure does have its benefits, the most important being the direct intake of Vitamin D, helping us to absorb calcium for stronger and healthier bones.  And spending time outdoors has countless advantages as well, such as the development of a more active lifestyle.

But we need to caution our loved ones from spending too much time in the sun and encourage them to take other precautions, such as wearing extra clothing, always wearing sunscreen and wearing a hat.

Here are six basic tips for protecting yourself and your family year round:

  • When outdoors, use sunscreens rated SPF 15 or higher.  Apply the lotion liberally, uniformly and frequently.  Make sure the sunscreen you are using is broad-spectrum sunscreen (to filter UVB and UVA rays).

  • Stay out of the midday sun (from 10am to 4pm) whenever you can.  You also should protect yourself from UV radiation reflected by sand, water, snow and ice.  UV radiation can go through light clothing, windshields, windows and clouds.

  • Wear long sleeves and long pants of tightly woven fabrics, a hat with a wide brim and sunglasses that absorb UV.

  • Stay away from sunlamps and tanning booths.

  • Do not sunbathe - period.

  • Teach your children good sun-protection habits at an early age.

The American Cancer Association also provides greats resources to better understand how to protect ourselves.  You can find this information at  http://www.cancer.org.

Being outdoors and enjoying the great Iowa weather is highly encouraged!  Just be careful and remember that simply protecting yourself from the sun's harmful rays can help you live a longer and healthier life.

###

The Trinity Cancer Center is one of 24 sites nationwide participating in a study to see if special exercises can help prevent lymphedema - a swelling of the arm and/or hand due to trauma to or removal of the lymph nodes - from occurring in breast cancer patients after surgery.  Trinity, which serves eastern Iowa and western Illinois, is the only site in Iowa and the only one outside of Chicago in Illinois participating in the study, which seeks to enroll 560 women across the country.

According to the Journal of Clinical Oncology, one recent study found that 42 percent of women will develop lymphedema within 5 years of treatment.  Lymphedema impacts not only how a person feels but also how well the person can perform activities of daily living.

To be eligible for the study, women must be recently diagnosed with breast cancer, be scheduled for surgery as part of their treatment but have not had surgery yet, be at least 18 years old and have no previous diagnosis of lymphedema.

Women who meet criteria and choose to participate will meet with a Trinity cancer research a total of five times.  The first visit includes the completion of consent and survey forms and measuring of hands and arms prior to surgery. The second "baseline" visit occurs up to six weeks after surgery and includes lymphedema education, completion of surveys and measurements and meeting with a therapy specialist to learn exercises that may help prevent lymphedema.

Participants also will be fitted for an elastic sleeve at that time.  Elastic sleeves are often used to prevent swelling during certain activities for those at risk of lymphedema.  There is no cost to receive the sleeve for study participants.

Subsequent visits will occur six, 12 and 18 months after the baseline visit to track measurements and complete further surveys.

"Lymphedema can severely impact quality of life," said Judy Howell, RN and study coordinator.  "Local participants could be helping to chart the course of post-surgical preventative care for thousands of other women across the country."

Trinity's Cancer Center has been offering national clinical trials and major prevention studies to members of the greater Quad-City area since 1987. Trinity, through an affiliation with the Cedar Rapids Oncology Project, is a part of a Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP), one of only 62 nationwide.

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has recognized this CCOP for excellence in cancer research. Trinity's Cancer Center has direct access to NCI-approved cancer treatment studies through the North Central Cancer Treatment Group, located at Mayo, Rochester, the Eastern Co-operative Oncology Group, the Clinical Trials Support Unit and other national research programs.  This means people living in the Quad-City area have local access to national cancer prevention studies and treatment clinical trials.

The study is funded by the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation, the Lance Armstrong Foundation, the National Cancer Institute and a private donor.  For more information, contact Judy Howell at (309) 779-5059.

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By: Jane M. Orient, M.D.

http://www.aapsonline.org

All eyes are on the BP gusher in the Gulf, spewing pollution over the shoreline, but there's another big leak that will do even more damage to our economy: the one in the Medicare well.

Ever since 1965, when Medicare was enacted, the federal Treasury has been hemorrhaging dollars. Previously, "10%" was quoted and re-quoted as the amount of fraud. More recently, Senator Tom Coburn (R-OK) alleged it to be 20%.

Like BP's oil containment dome, previous efforts failed to plug the hole. Despite hundreds of millions of dollars shoveled into the Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control Program (HCFAC) by HIPAA (the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act), federal prosecutors say they need still more "resources" and "tools."

Attorney General Eric Holder is looking for people to prosecute for both leaks?which will do nothing to stop the pollution.

Containment efforts in new Medicare rules include requiring doctors to "revalidate" their billing privileges periodically. They'll have to show that their name, address, identifying numbers, and organizational status are exactly as registered. They'll have to give Medicare access to their checking account by electronic funds transfer (EFT) so that it can make immediate "adjustments" in case of overpayment.

The Patient Protections and Affordable Care Act ("ObamaCare") imposes additional screening requirements; some providers will have to be fingerprinted.

Ever-more aggressive private bounty hunters called Recovery Audit Contractors (RACs) are descending on doctors' offices, dissecting claims and patients' records, looking for a missing "bullet point" in the documentation, or an inaccurate digit in the billing code. ObamaCare increases the penalties for errors from $11,000 per item to $50,000. The government's burden of proof, already light, has been further decreased. There is no need to prove any intent to defraud, or even to show that any money was ever collected.

Also, the definition of "fraud" is expanded to include "unnecessary" services, "ineffective" services, or those that don't comply with Medicare requirements.

Prosecutors are making examples of "greedy providers." Dr. Ronald Poulin of Virginia was smeared all over the pages of his local newspaper before being convicted of "fraud"?that previously would have been called billing errors. Pictures of his home were posted on the internet?a nice house, bought with decades of hard work, now seized, along with his cars, his bank accounts, his medical license, his reputation, and his liberty. He sits in jail awaiting assignment to a federal prison.

One less oncologist will be prescribing expensive chemotherapy to cancer patients?and there are other effects that we don't see. Deterrence works. Trying to help sick people is becoming very dangerous.

But will these methods end the fraud? Dr. Kenneth Christman, a past president of the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons (AAPS) (www.aapsonline.org), states that the amount of fraud is actually 100%, because Medicare is a Ponzi scheme. Today's soon-to-be-retiring Baby Boomers have been bilked as surely as Bernie Madoff's investors were, and their "trust fund" is full of internal government IOUs that can be redeemed only by borrowing from a bigger sucker.

Leaving ultimate Medicare reform aside, can we eliminate true billing fraud? Eliminating doctors does eliminate billing?of all types, by those doctors. But organized crime is said to be moving in.

As Malcolm Sparrow pointed out in a book by that title, third-party payment is A License to Steal. Payment is made for a "clean claim," not for a messy service. And despite the government's legal advantages, it takes time to go through the process of destroying doctors. So here's the overnight solution.

Make insurance fraud, like credit-card fraud, self-revealing. Do away with "assignment of benefits," which means paying the "provider." Mail all insurance payments to patients, in the form of a dual-payee check.

Dead or fictitious patients don't cash checks. Real people who did not receive a worthwhile service generally do not pay for it.

Fire the RACs, and put prosecutors to work fighting real crime, not creating crimes from arcane codes.  Restore the natural regulatory system of customers reading understandable bills. Don't put medical dollars into a huge bank vault that criminals can open with computer codes, and the practice of medicine into a bureaucratic prison.

Prisons don't stop leaks.

http://www.aapsonline.org



By: Jane M. Orient, M.D.

http://www.aapsonline.org

All eyes are on the BP gusher in the Gulf, spewing pollution over the shoreline, but there's another big leak that will do even more damage to our economy: the one in the Medicare well.

Ever since 1965, when Medicare was enacted, the federal Treasury has been hemorrhaging dollars. Previously, "10%" was quoted and re-quoted as the amount of fraud. More recently, Senator Tom Coburn (R-OK) alleged it to be 20%.

Like BP's oil containment dome, previous efforts failed to plug the hole. Despite hundreds of millions of dollars shoveled into the Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control Program (HCFAC) by HIPAA (the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act), federal prosecutors say they need still more "resources" and "tools."

Attorney General Eric Holder is looking for people to prosecute for both leaks?which will do nothing to stop the pollution.

Containment efforts in new Medicare rules include requiring doctors to "revalidate" their billing privileges periodically. They'll have to show that their name, address, identifying numbers, and organizational status are exactly as registered. They'll have to give Medicare access to their checking account by electronic funds transfer (EFT) so that it can make immediate "adjustments" in case of overpayment.

The Patient Protections and Affordable Care Act ("ObamaCare") imposes additional screening requirements; some providers will have to be fingerprinted.

Ever-more aggressive private bounty hunters called Recovery Audit Contractors (RACs) are descending on doctors' offices, dissecting claims and patients' records, looking for a missing "bullet point" in the documentation, or an inaccurate digit in the billing code. ObamaCare increases the penalties for errors from $11,000 per item to $50,000. The government's burden of proof, already light, has been further decreased. There is no need to prove any intent to defraud, or even to show that any money was ever collected.

Also, the definition of "fraud" is expanded to include "unnecessary" services, "ineffective" services, or those that don't comply with Medicare requirements.

Prosecutors are making examples of "greedy providers." Dr. Ronald Poulin of Virginia was smeared all over the pages of his local newspaper before being convicted of "fraud"?that previously would have been called billing errors. Pictures of his home were posted on the internet?a nice house, bought with decades of hard work, now seized, along with his cars, his bank accounts, his medical license, his reputation, and his liberty. He sits in jail awaiting assignment to a federal prison.

One less oncologist will be prescribing expensive chemotherapy to cancer patients?and there are other effects that we don't see. Deterrence works. Trying to help sick people is becoming very dangerous.

But will these methods end the fraud? Dr. Kenneth Christman, a past president of the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons (AAPS) (www.aapsonline.org), states that the amount of fraud is actually 100%, because Medicare is a Ponzi scheme. Today's soon-to-be-retiring Baby Boomers have been bilked as surely as Bernie Madoff's investors were, and their "trust fund" is full of internal government IOUs that can be redeemed only by borrowing from a bigger sucker.

Leaving ultimate Medicare reform aside, can we eliminate true billing fraud? Eliminating doctors does eliminate billing?of all types, by those doctors. But organized crime is said to be moving in.

As Malcolm Sparrow pointed out in a book by that title, third-party payment is A License to Steal. Payment is made for a "clean claim," not for a messy service. And despite the government's legal advantages, it takes time to go through the process of destroying doctors. So here's the overnight solution.

Make insurance fraud, like credit-card fraud, self-revealing. Do away with "assignment of benefits," which means paying the "provider." Mail all insurance payments to patients, in the form of a dual-payee check.

Dead or fictitious patients don't cash checks. Real people who did not receive a worthwhile service generally do not pay for it.

Fire the RACs, and put prosecutors to work fighting real crime, not creating crimes from arcane codes.  Restore the natural regulatory system of customers reading understandable bills. Don't put medical dollars into a huge bank vault that criminals can open with computer codes, and the practice of medicine into a bureaucratic prison.

Prisons don't stop leaks.

http://www.aapsonline.org

Healthiest schools, organizations, leaders to be honored

DES MOINES, IA (06/14/2010)(readMedia)-- Nominations are sought for the healthiest schools, organizations and individuals in Iowa. Last year was the inaugural Healthy Iowa Awards event. This year's banquet will be September 23, 5-9 p.m., at the Hy-Vee Conference Center in West Des Moines, Iowa.

"Everyone wants to be the best and this is the true designation for Iowans and their schools and communities for the overall healthiest," explained Jenny Weber, executive director of the Wellness Council of Iowa (WCI).

The Healthy Iowa Awards are presented by the Academy for a Healthy Iowa, a collaboration between the Iowa Department of Public Health, Governor's Council on Physical Fitness and Nutrition and WCI. Award winners are selected based on providing access to wellness, programming, financial commitment, measurability and sustainability. Winners retain the "Healthy Iowa" designation for three years at which point they must reapply.

The healthiest K-12 school, college or university, community and visionary leader will be honored. This year, two new categories are open: the emerging community award will celebrate small, grass-roots groups or communities and the emerging leader award will recognize youth leaders.

Application forms are available at www.wellnessiowa.org (click the top banner) and must be received by June 30.

The annual WCI Well Workplace award will also be presented at the Healthy Iowa event.

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