DAVENPORT, Iowa - July 15, 2009 -- Cancer does not only impact the patient. Children, grandchildren, spouses and other loved ones can also be involved in the cancer fight.

Cancer can disrupt families and disrupt their financial situations, making vacations more difficult.

From Aug. 2-Aug. 8, Genesis Health System, Gilda's Club of the Quad Cities and the Scott County Family Y will provide an opportunity for children coping with cancer in their families to enjoy time together at YMCA Camp Abe Lincoln.

Camp Genesis will provide children ages 8-12 with an outstanding resident camp experience with special cancer education programs provided by Gilda's Club and Genesis to help kids better cope with the effects of cancer in their family. The usual $450 camp fee will be donated by Genesis. There will be no charge to campers or their families.

"This camp will provide a much-needed opportunity for kids to just be kids,'' said Sally Werner, Director, Genesis Cancer Care Institute. "This camp will be a relief to parents who may be facing illness and financial concerns because of the illness.  They will be able to share the joy and fun their children and grandchildren are having by enjoying an active, safe camp experience. Camp Genesis will provide a unique camp experience specifically designed for children who are dealing with cancer in their families.''

Camp Genesis will provide youth impacted by cancer in their family with a great Y camp experience - from campfires and canoeing to horseback riding and swimming - at Camp Abe Lincoln. Mixed in with the fun will be 30 minutes of support and education each day from the experts at Gilda's Club. The Gilda's Club staff will help campers cope with the new stresses on their families caused by cancer.

New this year will be a Parent Night for camper parents to let them see what their child or children have been doing. There will be a presentation on Parent Night about the services available at Genesis to serve the needs of cancer patients and their families.

The Genesis Cancer Care Institute in Davenport has transformed cancer care in the region with new cancer-fighting technology, renovated facilities and an expanded focus on treating the "whole'' cancer patient and families.

Gilda's Club has an office at the Genesis Cancer Care Institute and offers its special support services throughout the Quad Cities from the Gilda's "clubhouse" at 1234 E. River Drive in Davenport.

"It is especially difficult for children affected by cancer to talk to their family and friends, to express fears, to ask questions, and explore their feelings,'' said Claudia Robinson, CEO of Gilda's Club of the Quad Cities. "Because it is impossible for children to change things that are beyond their control, it is important to help them identify and express what they realistically do control. Camp Genesis will help children learn to overcome obstacles in a fun and enriching environment.''

"Camp Abe Lincoln is the perfect location for our children to forget about their worries and just have fun,'' said Frank Klipsch, President and CEO of Scott County Family Y. "Camp is where children can step outside of their shells and experience something new. YMCA Camp Abe Lincoln was recently voted Best Camp by River City Readers and offers year-round character development programming at its 250-acre site located just outside Buffalo, Iowa. Camp Abe Lincoln has been serving Eastern Iowa and Western Illinois for more than 85 years.

Anyone who knows a child affected by cancer in their family is encouraged to call Gilda's Club Quad Cities at (563) 326-7504 for more information and applications. Information can also be found at www.ScottCountyFamilyY.org or by calling YMCA Camp Abe Lincoln at (563) 381-3053.

###

This Sunday, July 12, a group of Quad Citians will be collecting handprints for, and displaying the progress of, the "Lend a Hand for Health Care Project." This local grassroots project highlights the expanding health care crisis and how it affects American lives. Each year some 22,000 people in America between the ages of 25 and 65 die, due to a lack of health insurance. These victims of a broken system delayed seeking medical care because they could not afford the medications or treatment they needed.

The "Lend a Hand for Health Care Project" was started in 2005 as a way to engage our communi ty and elected officials in a discussion about comprehensive health care reform. Each participant places a painted handprint on our canvass to symbolize one American who has died because he or she didn't have coverage. To date, over 6,800 people have participated, including President Barack Obama, Senator Tom Harkin, Senator Dick Durbin, and Dr. Howard Dean.

The project will be on display, and handprints will be collected, at the Augustana College Pepsico Center in Rock Island. The event will go from 1:00 - 5:00 pm on Sunday, July 12. At 3:00 p.m. there will be a brief program about the handprint project and updated information on the health care proposals being discussed in Washington, DC this year. We will also discuss ways we can make our voices heard now in support of real health care reform.

What: "Lend a Hand for Health Care Project" event
When: 1:00 - 5:00 pm Sunday July 12th (with program at 3:00)
Where: The Augustana College Pepsico Center, 30th St. and 11th Ave. in Rock Island
Who: Progressive Action for the Common Good, Change That Works, Campaign for Better Health Care

###

Davenport, Iowa July 6, 2009 - The Alzheimer's Association, Greater Iowa Chapter, is hosting a series of family education classes aimed at helping families to identify Alzheimer's and on developing effective strategies for coping with the disease.

The family education series is presented in three parts: "An Alzheimer's Primer"- identifying Alzheimer's from regular aging and a guide to finding resources; "Loving Miss Lillie" - appropriate communication strategies for Alzheimer's caregivers; and "Legal and Financial Matters" - how to protect assets while providing the best care possible for your loved one.

"With an aging baby boomer population and the country facing unprecedented economic challenges, it is important that caregivers and potential caregivers be aware of the best methods for dealing with Alzheimer's," said Jerry Schroeder, program specialist with the Alzheimer's Association's Greater Iowa Chapter, "an estimated 210,000 Illinois residents will be living with the disease by 2010. We need to make every effort to address the needs of the community. This series will help us reach out to those most in need."

 

The series will be held:

Mercer County: Viola Presbyterian Church, Route 17, Viola, IL

Tuesday, July 16 from 5:30-7pm,"An Alzheimer's Primer"

Tuesday, July 23 from 5:30-7pm, "Loving Miss Lillie"

Tuesday, July 30 from 5:30-7pm,"Legal and Financial Matters"

Henry County: Geneseo Community Center, 541 E North Street, Geneseo, IL

Wednesday, August 19 from 5:30-7pm,"An Alzheimer's Primer"

Wednesday, August 26 from 5:30-7pm, "Loving Miss Lillie"

Wednesday, September 2 from 5:30-7pm,"Legal and Financial Matters"

Rock Island County:  In Touch Adult Day Care, 4011 Avenue of the Cities, Moline, IL

Thursday, August 20 from 5:30-7pm, "An Alzheimer's Primer"

Thursday, August 27 from 5:30-7pm, "Loving Miss Lillie"

Thursday, September 3 from 5:30-7pm, "Legal and Financial Matters"

Dinner is included although there is no cost to attend. Registration required; call the Alzheimer's Association office at 563-324-1022. The series is made possible by a grant funded by the Western Illinois Area on Aging.

 

The Alzheimer's Association

The Alzheimer's Association is the leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer care, support and research. Our mission is to eliminate Alzheimer's disease through the advancement of research; to provide and enhance care and support for all affected; and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health. Our vision is a world without Alzheimer's.

# # #

An alternative health detox spa in Davenport featuring medicinal hydrotherapy, alkaline drinking water and orthomolecular medicine for the treatment of alcoholism is now receiving clients.  Michael Grady, Director of Atlantispa in Davenport, said that the spa is one of only a handful in the United States to feature both specialized hydrotherapy and orthomolecular medicine in one setting.

The spa features medicinal detoxification hydrotherapy involving full body immersion in water treated with far infrared heat, essential oil, trace ozone, ultrasonic bubbles, vitamin C and hydrogen peroxide.  Detoxification is further enhanced with alkaline drinking water with over 50 natural trace nutrients.  Orthomolecular medicine, or vitamin mega-dosing with niacin and vitamin C, works in a complementary way to help rebuild the body's defenses. "The program intention is to remove what's dangerous and install what's healthy. Studies show that our treatments are effective and with no harmful side effect," says Grady.

Clients can expect a higher than average rate of long-term sobriety through this unique program, in addition to helping with other health programs. The average treatment length is 18 to 36 visits, at an average cost of $50 per visit.

The treatment center, located at 235 West 35th Street in Davenport (above Nick Tarpein Martial Arts) is flexible to accommodate client schedules from early morning to late evening. For a free assessment, contact Atlantispa at 563-445-7331.

Free Medical Marijuana Documentary and Forum at Bettendorf Public Library this Saturday at 3 pm

The Marijuana Policy Project will be showing the award winning documentary, "Waiting to Inhale", this Saturday at the Bettendorf Public Library.  The film will be shown at 3:00 pm and will be followed by patient testimonies.  A legal expert and medical cannabis lobbyist will lead a forum where the general public can ask questions about the legislation, which will be debated by our state legislature next spring.

Bettendorf, Iowa, June 16
- On Saturday, June 20 at 3:00 p.m., a free screening of the award-winning medical marijuana documentary "Waiting to Inhale" will be held at the Bettendorf Public Library in the Quad Cities.  The screening will be followed by a discussion with patients and advocates involved in this year's efforts to make Iowa the 14th state to protect medical marijuana patients from arrest.

Ray Lakers, a Multiple Sclerosis patient, served time in jail for possession of less than one gram of marijuana.  Jeff Elton, a Diabetic Neuropathic Gastroparesis patient, claims marijuana to be the only medicine that stops his nausea.  Lisa Jackson will explain what it's like to live with Fibromyalgia and how medical marijuana saved her from overdosing on her old medications.  Also speaking will be Jacob Orr, a severe chronic pain patient who replaced highly addictive and dangerous opiates with medical marijuana.

The event is being led by Jimmy Morrison, a grassroots organizer for the largest medical marijuana lobbyist organization in the country.  Carl Olsen will explain the progress his lawsuit has made in finally addressing the medical marijuana legislation already passed in this state in 1979.  They hope to answer the many questions Iowans may have about the bill S.F. 293, which Senator Joe Bolkcom (D-Iowa City) introduced to be debated in the spring of 2010.  There are currently 13 states who have legalized medical marijuana, the most recent being Michigan where a ballot initiative was passed with 63% of the vote.  None of these states have found an increase in teen drug use since passing legislation.

The federal government started the Investigational New Drug Program decades ago, which grows and provides medical marijuana for free to fifteen patients.  Although the program has been shut down and only four patients are still alive, George McMahon and Barbara Douglass, both Iowa residents, continue to receive legal medical marijuana every month.  George McMahon suffers from Nail-Patella Syndrome and Barbara Douglass has Multiple Sclerosis.

In 1988, DEA Chief Administrative Law Judge Francis Young ruled marijuana to be "in its natural form, one of the safest therapeutically active substances known to man."  In 1999, the White House commissioned the Institute of Medicine to review all medical literature on marijuana.  This review found "Nausea, appetite loss, pain, and anxiety are all afflictions of wasting and can be mitigated by marijuana.  Although some medications are more effective than marijuana for these problems, they are not equally effective in all patients."  Since February of 2007, three studies have shown marijuana relieves neuropathic pain, commonly associated with AIDS, Multiple Sclerosis, Diabetes, and other illnesses.

Marijuana is Schedule I in Iowa, which means it has no accepted medical value.  This schedule includes such drugs as LSD and pure heroine; however, marijuana is also Schedule II in Iowa, which means it has accepted medical value.  Schedule II includes such drugs as cocaine, morpheine, oxycodone, other opiates, and methamphetamine.  In 1979, the Iowa Board of Pharmacy Examiners, a bureacracy, was supposed to study and decide if there is accepted medical value in the United States.  They recently disobeyed a court order to address the issue.

The documentary to be shown, "Waiting to Inhale", was produced and directed by Jed Riffe and was partially funded by the Marijuana Policy Project's grants program.  The film examines the medical marijuana debate up close by taking you inside the lives of patients, doctors, and activists, while seeking to understand why opponents support the continued criminalization of our sick and dying.  "Waiting to Inhale" has already played to critical acclaim, having won the 2005 CINE Golden Eagle Award, the Gold Special Jury Remi Award at the 38th Annual WorldFest-Houston, and the 2005 Best Documentary Film/Video at the New Jersey International Film Festival.

MOLINE, ILLINOIS - WQPT will air WorldFocus: Outbreak - A Special Report, a timely special on the Influenza A (H1N1) virus on Wednesday, May 6 at 9:00 p.m.   It has been the lead news story around the world for the past two weeks. Misinformation and rumors abound, Global experts will tell you what you need to know today to protect yourself from this virulent flu.  Panelists on the program include :

Dr. Stephen Morse, Professor of Clinical Epidemiology, Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health; Founding Director & Senior Res. Scientist, Center for Public Health Preparedness: Author Emerging Viruses.

Laurie Garret, Senior Fellow for Global Health, Council on Foreign Relations

Simon Tay Fellow, Asia Society Chairman; Singapore Institute of International Relations

Christopher Sabatin, Senior Director of Policy, Council of the Americas

While the infection rate seems to be subsiding in Mexico for now, many other countries are preparing for potential outbreaks, either now or later in the year when the typical flu season begins again in the northern hemisphere.

The special will be hosted by Martin Savidge and Daljit Dhaliwal.

WQPT airs WorldFocus Monday through Friday at 6:30 p.m.

Concerned about Health Care Reform?

Let your voice be heard.

Trinity at Terrace Park
Conference Room A/B
Thursday, April 23
7:30 -9:00 am
$15 per person - includes breakfast

Join us at Trinity at Terrace Park for a discussion on Health Care Reform. Dr. Alta Price and Karen Metcalf will present findings from a Town Hall Meeting on Health Care Reform which was held on March 28 at Augustana College. The Town Hall Meeting was open to the public and allowed citizens to discuss community health care needs and share ideas about the meaningful and measurable changes needed in order to meet those needs.

Input from the Town Hall Meeting will be forwarded on to the local congressional delegation. Make sure the business community is heard! This breakfast will be informative and will allow you to express your views.

Call the Bettendorf Chamber of Commerce at 355-4753 for reservations.

Thank you to our sponsor: Trinity Regional Health System.

Davenport, April 2009 -  Randy & Amy Johnson of Orion, IL know the heartaches and challenges of being parents to a child with a fatal disease firsthand: their son, Dillon, 15 yrs old, suffers from the devastating disease cystic fibrosis.  "Although to look at Dillon, one would see a very normal, active 15 year old, but the reality is that combating the effects of cystic fibrosis and keeping him healthy involves daily medications and time consuming treatments to break up the mucus in his lungs and fight infections as well as enzyme pills to help him digest his food properly." said Johnson.

CF is a genetic disease that affects tens of thousands of children and adults in the United States.  More than ten million Americans are unknowing, symptomless carriers of one copy of the defective CF gene:  It takes two copies of the gene for a child to be born with CF. The defective gene causes the body to produce a faulty protein that leads to abnormally thick, sticky mucus that clogs the lungs and results in life-threatening lung infections and respiratory problems. The mucus also obstructs the pancreas, causing inability in the body to absorb nutrients in food. The median life expectancy has improved from early childhood in the 1950s to the mid-30s today; however, most individuals with CF must battle lung disease for their entire lives.

"When Dillon was diagnosed with CF at 2 1/2 years, I started to campaign on behalf of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation's GREAT STRIDES Walk in 1998.  I had set a goal of $1,500, but ended up raising over $3,000!  I was amazed at how our family and friends supported us then and continue to do so today.  Many people say that fundraising is hard," said Johnson, "but that's not how parents with a child who has a fatal illness see it.  While we're glad that CF research has increased the life expectancy of CF patients to the mid-thirties, that's not good enough for us!"

The GREAT STRIDES Walk raises millions of dollars nationally each year to fund vital cystic fibrosis (CF) research and care programs and is the CF Foundation's largest and fastest-growing event. The Quad Cities Walk will take place on April 25, 2009 at the Scott County Park - Whispering Pines Shelter.  Registration begins at 9 a.m. and the Walk starts at 10 a.m.  In addition to the walk, there will be food and music, kids activities, and a silent auction.

This year, GREAT STRIDES Quad Cities plans to raise over $40,000 at the Walk to fund the cutting-edge research that has the potential for making a profound impact on the lives of children and young adults with the disease.  More than 90 cents of every dollar raised is used to fund CF research and care programs.

"Although the CF Foundation is proud of its achievements in its 50-year history, lives continue to be lost every day to cystic fibrosis.  The need for financial support is more critical than ever, said Claire Scholl, Director of the Iowa Chapter.  "For the first time in the CF Foundation's history, scientific opportunities are coming at a pace that exceeds the ability to fund them. GREAT STRIDES is a community event, and the community is uniting now to keep the funds coming and the momentum of research advances going."

Call the Iowa Chapter at 515-252-1530 for more information, or visit our website at www.cff.org.

###

A dvd video presentation from the makers of "What the Bleep do We Know?" will reveal water as you've never seen it.  Afterward, presenter Michael Grady, owner of Atlantispa, will demonstrate how to artificially make healthy spring quality water that you can make at home."

7.00 pm on Thursday April 9th. 2009 @ the Independent Scholars' Evenings, 513 16th St, Moline (2nd. Floor). Doors open at 6.30 pm.

The event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments are served.

Please look into our website: www.qcinstitute.org

Independent Scholars' Evenings are sponsored by The Institute for Cultural and Healing Traditions, Ltd a 501(c) 3. The Institute began in 1996.

Colona, IL - A milestone event occurred for Hammond-Henry Hospital out of Geneseo, IL recently.  At 10:00 a.m. on March 17, 2009 a groundbreaking ceremony was held to commemorate the beginning of construction on the new Hammond-Henry Colona Clinic, located at 1604 Cleveland Road in Colona, IL.

Brad Solberg, Hammond-Henry Hospital's CEO, kicked off the event by welcoming all attendees. Other speakers included: Judith Gilbert, City of Colona Economic Development Coordinator; Sue Gray, Hammond-Henry Hospital's Board Chair and Thomas Fennelly, Russell Construction Senior Vice President in charge of construction on the new facility. Other company representatives in attendance for the ceremony included Blackhawk Bank & Trust and the Geneseo School District.

As a 3,500 s.f. medical office building, the new Hammond-Henry Colona Clinic will house several physicians and other building amenities, such as: a vestibule, waiting area, exam rooms, laboratory space, storage rooms and offices.  Construction is set to be fully underway by Monday, March 23, 2009 and will be completed by October 2009.

Hammond-Henry Hospital was established in 1901, utilizing approximately 82 beds and serves nearly 20,000 residents in the Geneseo, IL area.  The new Colona Clinic will allow them to more effectively reach out and serve residents within the hospital district and county by providing quality care and exceptional service.

Russell Construction, located in Davenport, IA, is serving as the Design/Builder and General Contractor on this new Hammond-Henry Hospital project.  Shive-Hattery, located in Moline, IL will serve as the Architect.  The Colona Clinic is the second project that Russell Construction has completed for Hammond-Henry Hospital. In 2004, Russell Construction served as Design/Builder on a 34,000 s.f. addition and renovation to their hospital in Geneseo, IL.  Now, five years later, Russell has once again been selected by Hammond-Henry Hospital because of their focus on building positive long-lasting relationships while delivering a successful and efficient project.

# # #

Pages