Internationally renowned "sculptor" Roy Staab will be making an appearance and giving a lecture at the Mode Gallery in downtown Davenport on Saturday, May 27, at 6 p.m. Staab's appearance is in conjunction with a two-week exhibit of his work at Mode.

 

 

At her house, Katie Kiley is drawing in India ink on a wooden vase created by Steve Sinner. Using magnifying-glass headgear and two of the finest-point pens she could find, she's creating eight panels around the vase, depicting scenes from a California town. The naked eye can't appreciate the level of detail, and each panel takes two weeks to complete, she said.

Sinner expects to sell the piece for $20,000, Kiley said, and she's being extremely careful with the vessel. "I have this resting on a down pillow," she said.

Sinner, of course, is among the most highly regarded artists in the Quad Cities, and Kiley notes that he knows what price his work commands. But she is no slouch, as evidenced by two awards she won in the 181st Invitational Exhibition of Contemporary American Art, presented by the National Academy in New York City.

Internally illuminated torso sculptures made of paper, rough-shaped hide-like weavings with primitive figures, shimmering digital photographic constructions of a transmogrified rock-and-roll icon, and a leg crowned with a house covered in plastic toy babies represent just a sliver of the powerful artistic diversity to be discovered at this year's Venus Envy art exhibit, which populates the first three floors at Bucktown Center for the Arts (in downtown Davenport) through May 26.

A tall, enigmatic pyramid constructed from a series of stacked cubes stands perched on the balcony, a silent witness to the comings and goings of the travelers below. The pyramid's surface is covered with patches of colored sheet metal riddled with snippets of old advertising and logos. Each cube's facet is a small composition in its own right. The fragments of pop-culture detritus of the ziggurat's skin beg to be organized and deciphered, but yield no clear message.

In discussing the Quad Cities’ inaugural Venus Envy last year, festival
chair Rachael Mullins said she hoped to draw between 300 and 500
people.
Mallarie Zimmer, the founder of Venus Envy who has spread her
celebration of women and the arts from St.

The response to our spring photo contest was, in a word, overwhelming, with double the number of entries we received last fall. For the first time in our photo competitions, last fall we built the contest around themes ("danger," "metamorphosis," and "liberation") rather than categories such as "people" and "places.

A mighty princess constructed from painted nails, fabric, and costume jewelry stands proudly with her rusted sword-like scepter overhead. Her spontaneous presence tells us that she is the product of a visually inquisitive soul with a sincere enthusiasm for image making.

The latest exhibit at the Figge Art Museum, Migration of the Spirit, creates an unsettling mood that is simultaneously full of melancholy and levity. The exhibit, which runs through April 16, is a powerful show that explores a tragic history through the vision of Miami-based artist Edouard Duval-Carrié.

Editor's note: Steve Banks served as one of four jurors for this exhibit. Image & Word, the latest show at Quad City Arts, is a comfortably diverse exploration of the uses of text and its relationship with and within images.

The current solo show by Emily Christensen is a little visual firecracker that delivers a bang that will leave your eyes happily ringing long after you see the work. The show is tucked away on the second floor of Bucktown Center for the Arts in the doe Gallery and is up through March 25.

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