• John Brassard Jr.: “Murder & Mayhem in Scott County, Iowa,” February 19

    Unexpected, dark, and even horrific sides of Scott County history are explored in a 2018 book by John Brassard Jr., and on February 19, the Eastern Iowa author will visit Bettendorf's Crawford Brew Works in order to share real-life tales from his historical offering Murder & Mayhem in Scott County, Iowa.

  • QCA Today Headlines Quad Cities - Sunset Marina Rock Island, Illinois
    QCA Today: February 17, 2019

    This feature collects articles published online by Quad Cities-area media outlets and by CapitolFax.com and the state-politics sections of the Des Moines Register and the State Journal-Register.

  • “RACE: Are We So Different?”, January 26 through June 2

    Race is an issue that, in daily life, can feel like a daunting one to approach. Yet Davenport's Putnam Museum & Science Center is addressing the subject head-on in its new, interactive, and accessible traveling exhibition RACE: Are We So Different? Open to museum guests from January 26 through June 2, RACE aims to help visitors of all ages better understand the origins and manifestations of race and racism in everyday life by investigating race and challenging its misconceptions through the framework of science. And as Putnam President and CEO Kim Findlay says, it's an exhibit designed “to explore race through history, science, and culture – which happen to be the three things the Putnam focuses on.”

  • “My Funny Valentine,” February 8

    As the noted comedians take on such topics as relationships, dating, parenting, and family life, audiences seeking a Valentine's date of laughter will no doubt find it at Galesburg's Orpheum Theatre February 8 presentation My Funny Valentine, a hilarious he said/she said boasting the standup skills of Seinfeld veteran Pat Hazell and former Miss New Jersey Dena Blizzard.

  • Antics, February 2

    Lauded by the Los Angels Times as a hip-hop dance ensemble that's “able to use spins and locking to convey everything from grief to animalism to wisdom,” the touring talents of Antics serve as the latest guests in Quad City Arts' Visiting Artists series, their February 2 engagement at St. Ambrose University demonstrating why a recent performance inspired Explore Dance to rave, “Windmills, acrobatic back-flips, and uprock that oozed attitude were some of the dazzling dance feats on display.”

  • The Price of Pension Payments

    Governor JB Pritzker's administration has confirmed that its new public pension plan will slash $800 million from the state's scheduled pension payment next fiscal year, which begins July 1.

  • The Effects of “Dark Money” on the Governor's Agenda

    Two "dark money" groups are stepping up to separately promote and attack the new governor's agenda.

  • “No-Knock Raid” Is Just Another Term for “Violent Home Invasion”

    On January 28, home invaders murdered 58-year-old Rhogena Nicholas and 59-year-old Dennis Tuttle of Houston, Texas. Nicholas and Tuttle wounded five of the (numerous) armed burglars before being slain.

    That's not how the news accounts put it, of course. Typical headline (from the Houston Chronicle): "4 HPD officers shot in southeast Houston narcotics operation, a fifth injured."

  • Uncle Sam Wants Your DNA: The FBI’s Diabolical Plan to Create a Nation of Suspects

    Uncle Sam wants you.

    Correction: Uncle Sam wants your DNA.

    Actually, if the government gets its hands on your DNA, they as good as have you in their clutches.

  • Smoke Doesn't Always Mean Fire

    We've known for weeks now that the FBI recorded Chicago Alderman Ed Burke's mobile-phone conversations over a period of eight months, listening in on 9,475 calls. And then we discovered that the feds had wired up Chicago Alderman Danny Solis during his own conversations with Burke.

  • “A Doll's House, Part 2,” February 15 through March 3

    Described by the New York Times as “smart, funny, and utterly engrossing” and by Time Out NY as “modern in its language, mordant in its humor, and suspenseful in its plotting,” author Lucas Hnath's A Doll's House, Part 2 makes its area debut at Davenport's QC Theatre Workshop February 15 through March 3, treating audiences to the Broadway hit of 2017 that Deadline magazine called “the sharpest play of the year.”

  • “Aesop's Falables (A Rock Musical),” February 16 through 24

    A series of fractured fairytales that families can dance to will delight audiences from February 16 through 24, as Davenport Junior Theatre stages the area premiere of Aesop's Falables (A Rock Musical), a student-performed entertainment in which Aesop's familiar figures rebel against their stereotypes and teach valuable lessons along the way.

  • “A Gentleman's Guide to Love & Murder,” February 14 through 24

    Winner of four 2014 Tony Awards including Best Musical, the raucous Broadway comedy A Gentleman's Guide to Love & Murder serves as the first production of the 2019 season for Moline's Spotlight Theatre, its February 14 through 24 run demonstrating why the New York Times described the show as “ingenious” and “among the most inspired and entertaining of new musicals.”

  • “Seussical Jr.,” February 22 through March 3

    For the third year in a row, the Center for Living Arts, the Penguin Project of the Quad Cities, and Augustana College's theatre department are teaming up to help turn kids into stage stars, which they'll do in the February 22 through March 3 Brunner Theatre Center run of Seussical Jr. a production that boasts a cast composed of talented youths with special needs.

  • “Diamonds & Divas: A Murderous Fiasco,” February 27 through April 6

    Running February 27 through April 6 at the Circa '21 Dinner Playhouse, playwright Robin Hawdon's slapstick riot Diamonds & Divas: A Murderous Fiasco takes audiences away from winter weather and abroad to the sunny provinces of the Cannes Film Festival, with the Rock Island venue the first professional theatre in the United States ever to produce this madcap comedy.

  • Patrick Sweany, February 17

    With Glide magazine calling the musician “effortlessly cool” and “a tried and true blues rocker hell-bent on getting the job done,” Patrick Sweany serves as the February 17 headliner at Davenport's Rhythm City Casino Resort, performing in support of his 2018 album Ancient Noise that American Songwriter awarded four stars and raves for the artist's “gritty honesty” and “wired, emotional playing and singing.”

  • “The Human Heart,” February 16 and 17

    For the group's first concerts of 2019, the professional vocal ensemble the Nova Singers will celebrate The Human Heart in song on February 16 and 17 – a post-Valentine's Day weekend filled with glorious choral arrangements brought to life via the directorial talents of Dr. Laura Lane and the Nova Singers' 22 gifted vocalists.

  • Manny Lopez Septet, February 17

    An area great that Jazz News calls “exceptionally illuminating,” trumpet and flugelhorn master Manny Lopez performs with his Manny Lopez Septet in the latest event in Polyrhythms' Third Sunday Jazz Workshop & Matinée Series, the musicians' February 17 Redstone Room concert treating fans to the singular jazz stylings that have thrilled local audiences for more than four decades.

  • Dreamer Boy, February 20

    Dreamer Boy, the '80s-worshipping white-boy-R&B/“lo-fi hip-hop beats to relax and study to”-core project of Nashville-based singer Zach Taylor, plays a Moeller Nights concert at Davenport's Triple Crown Whiskey Bar & Raccoon Motel on February 20.

  • James Taylor and Bonnie Raitt, February 23

    Two legendary music icons – both of them 2000 inductees in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame – will share the stage at Moline's TaxSlayer Center on February 23, with the venue delivering the long-awaited pairing of folk and Americana singer/songwriter James Taylor, recipient of a 2015 Presidential Medal of Freedom, and blues-rock star Bonnie Raitt, winner of the National Guitar Museum's 2017 Lifetime Achievement Award.

  • Hot Damn!: “Cold Pursuit,” “The Prodigy,” “What Men Want,” and “The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part”

    Hollywood unveiled a quartet of new releases over the weekend – a comedy-hit reboot, a high-concept horror flick, a fourth franchise installment, and a Liam Neeson revenge thriller – and the only thing that seemed to link them was that they were all examples of types of movies that generally aren't good. But surprise! They were actually all good, if of undeniably varying levels of goodness.

  • No Longer Quiet on the Western Front: "They Shall Not Grow Old," "The Least of These: The Graham Staines Story," and "Miss Bala"

    Culled from more than 100 hours of documentary footage from more than 100 years ago, Peter Jackson's World War I documentary They Shall Not Grow Old is an almost unquestionably astounding achievement – and not merely because what began as a two-day special engagement in December made so much money, and was so beloved by patrons, that it's currently enjoying a full, and fully deserved, theatrical run.

  • A Very Fine Mess They've Gotten Themselves Into: “Stan & Ollie,” “The Kid Who Would Be King,” and “Serenity”

    I haven't had living grandparents for many years now, but if I did, I'd immediately guide them toward the wonderful new Laurel-and-Hardy bio-pic Stan & Ollie. Is there any way, even if you're not a grandparent (or great-grandparent) yourself, that I can instead guide you toward it?

  • The 2019 Academy Award Nominations

    It's easy, on Oscar-nomination morning, to be surprised and/or upset about names and titles not cited, and this morning, when the nominees for the 91st Annual Academy Awards were read by Kumail Nanjiani and Tracee Ellis Ross, there were certainly omissions that some might find surprising and/or upsetting. (Okay, that I might find surprising and/or upsetting: No mention of the Mr. Rogers doc Won't You Be My Neighbor?!? Come on!) But before diving too deeply into who's not there, let's take a paragraph-long moment to appreciate who is – more specifically, who finally is.

  • She Don't Need Another Hero: “Glass”

    M. Night Shyamalan has publicly stated that there won't be any sequels to Glass, the auteur's quasi-comic-book thriller that is itself a sequel to 2000's Unbreakable and 2017's Split, and I have no reason to doubt the man. Yet I'm hoping Shyamalan might at least consider a prequel or two, because as of now, I'm not quite ready to be done with James McAvoy's electrifying, disarmingly jovial performance(s) as Kevin Wendell Crumb, the conflicted serial killer who, in Split, made life hell for a trio of kidnapped teens. I wouldn't even mind if those prequels were as messy and overwrought as Glass, just so long as they were equally entertaining.

Art

  • “Louis Comfort Tiffany: Treasures from the Driehaus Collection,” February 16 through May 19

    One of the most renowned artisans in American history, and the beautiful works that bear his name, will be celebrated in a February 16 through May 19 traveling exhibition at the Figge Art Museum, with the Davenport venue showcasing sublime colors and the glorious fragility of glass in Louis Comfort Tiffany: Treasures from the Driehaus Collection.

  • “Under Construction: Recent Works by Corrine Smith,” January 26 through February 23

    Evocative works by a Quad Cities artist of more than three decades will be on display at the Beréskin Gallery & Art Academy from January 26 through February 23, as the Bettendorf venue showcases mergers of line, design, and print-making in the new exhibit Under Construction: Recent Works by Corrine Smith.

  • Glenn Boyles Exhibit, December 1 through February 28

    In addition to serving as the education coordinator for Bettendorf's Family Museum, a job that he says “allows me to be creative in the design of art, science, and play activities,” Glenn Boyles is a gifted artist working primarily in painting and drawing, and works by this gifted Marycrest University alumnus will be on display at the Moline Centre Station Gallery from December 1 through February 28.

  • Linda Buechting, Paul Nitsche, and Corrine Smith Exhibit, January 3 through February 28

    Watercolors, sculptures, mono-prints, and more will be on display in the first Quad City Arts International Airport Gallery exhibition of 2019, with the January 3 through February 28 artistic showcase boasting works by Linda Buechting of Quincy, Illinois, Paul Nitsche of Ridgeway, Wisconsin, and Corrine Smith of Rock Island.

  • Kenneth Cunningham and Brian Schulz Exhibits, February 1 through March 22

    The personal beliefs and significant experiences of two Iowa-based artisans will be expressed in a fascinating pair of Quad City Arts Center Gallery exhibitions February 1 through March 22: Esprit De Corps: The Brotherhood of Paratroopers, Rangers, & Special Forces at War by Eldridge painter Kenneth Cunningham, and Sophisticated Disobedience by Davenport's stpray-paint-college artist Brian Schulz.