Having enjoyed a sold-out sensation with its production of the ABBA musical Mamma Mia!, the Circa '21 Dinner Playhouse wraps up its 2017-18 season, from September 19 through November 3, with another stage hit boasting a mother in the title: Mama Won't Fly, a delightful road-trip comedy by the playwriting team of Jessie Jones, Nicholas Hope, and Jamie Wooten that Broadway World decreed “moves quickly and never lets up on the laughs.”

With Time Out NY calling the show “Broadway's funniest, splashiest, slap-happiest musical comedy in at least 400 years,” Davenport's Adler Theatre opens its 2018-19 season of Broadway at the Adler performances with the September 22 touring production Something Rotten!, the zany, Tony-winning farce that the Hollywood Reporter called “a big, brash, meta-musical studiously fashioned in the mold of Monty Python's Spamalot.”

With the sentiment of the late Aretha Franklin and her famous song lyric, I extend R-E-S-P-E-C-T to the cast and crew of the Timber Lake Playhouse for delivering a most entertaining production of Larry Gallagher’s Beehive: The '60s Musical. The show's six posed, and composed, young actresses grabbed your attention from the start of Saturday's matinée performance, with each diva poised upon their platforms ready to explode with talent from the opening scene.

Augustana College will start its 2018-19 theatre season off with a bang – and a “Ribbit!” – via its September 15 and 16 presentation The Frog & the Princess, a family comedy featuring classic storytelling, untraditional romance, and hilarious one-liners, and adapted by Brandon Roberts from the Brothers Grimm fairytale.

Described by ChicagoCritic.com as “very beautiful and moving” and “a wonderful tale of personal bonding that transcends the grave,” Tuesdays with Morrie – the stage adaptation of Mitch Albom's bestselling memoir – runs at the Playcrafters Barn Theatre September 14 through 23, with Variety magazine calling the two-man drama a “life-affirming” work “poignantly emphasizing the necessity of enjoying life while we have it.”

Winner of the 2007 Pulitzer Prize for Drama and a 2006 Tony Award for star Cynthia Nixon, David Lindsay-Abaire's moving, haunting, unexpectedly funny family drama Rabbit Hole enjoys a September 6 through 8 staging at St. Ambrose University's Studio Theatre, the New York Times praising the work for its “honesty, accuracy, and humor” while adding that the show “inspires such copious weeping among its audience that you wonder early on if you should have taken a life jacket.”

Dead Man's Cell Phone

“When something rings, you have to answer it. Don't you?” pleads Jean (Jessica Taylor), the mousy, bespectacled protagonist of the QC Theatre Workshop's wildly imaginative production of Dead Man's Cell Phone. This Sarah Ruhl play serves as a commentary on how modern technology both isolates us and connects us. Or at least, that's what Wikipedia would like us to believe … .

Soaring with melodies from another galaxy, the Timber Lake Playhouse's Forever Plaid is energetic, light-hearted, and funny in its nostalgic revue of 1950s close-harmony guy groups. Saturday's matinée performance of this outstanding production – directed and choreographed by Gregory Daniels, with the original musical arrangements by James Raitt – just kept getting more entertaining as the show went on.

“Welcome to the Hotel California,” crooned the Eagles as the lights dimmed on Thursday's opening-night performance of California Suite at the Richmond Hill Barn Theatre. It was the perfect – and, let’s be honest, most obvious – song choice for this straightforward production of Neil Simon’s comedy.

Dead Man's Cell Phone

Described by the New York Times as “a hallucinatory poetic fantasy that blends the mundane and the metaphysical, the blunt and the obscure, the patently bizarre and the bizarrely moving,” Tony Award nominee Sarah Ruhl's Dead Man's Cell Phone will enjoy its area debut at Davenport's QC Theatre Workshop August 24 through September 9, Ruhl's funny and thoughtful comedy inspiring SFGate.com to laud the author's “gifts of probing humor, vivid imagination, and poignant humanity.”

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