Geneseo's Richmond Hill Barn Theatre is currently presenting Vintage Hitchcock: A Live Radio Play, adapted by Joe Landry – another production canceled due to COVID, then rescheduled, with most of the original cast intact. It's a tasty helping of suspense and murder, with a sprinkling of humor.

If you were to tell me a marriage could teeter on the brink of destruction simply due to the addition of a dog … I’d have countered that no one would let canine conflict get that far. Only that’s exactly what happens in the Playcrafters Barn Theatre's production of Sylvia, written by A.R. Gurney and directed by Kathy Graham. Friday’s performance ultimately left me feeling like I am killing it with marriage, as both my husband and I agree on our position on getting a dog: While they’re great, dog ownership simply isn’t for us.

Alexander Richardson’s Their Town is inspired by Our Town, as opposed to being a direct update of Wilder's story. And by using the original text as inspiration, Richardson gave us a fresh take on what the classic play means in a modern world, updating characters, plot structure, relationships, stage design, and more.

Veteran venue director M. Seth Reines, accomplished music director Ron May, and the supremely talented cast and on-point crew are dedicated professionals. Unfortunately, the quality of Clue: The Musical's material did not approach the level of their talents.

Often, mass tragedies are best understood not through bare statistics, but through personal stories of those affected. My Brother's Gift, a play by Claudia Haas based on the real experiences of survivor Eva Geiringer Schloss, tells one of these stories. I saw it on Saturday at the Black Box Theatre, and director, designer, and Black Box co-founder Lora Adams and her cast and crew have put together a spare, straightforward production that serves both as a remembrance and a call to action.

Ka-pow! T. Green and Calvin Vo, the co-stars, co-masterminds, and co-comedy icons behind Haus of Ruckus, came onstage for the pre-show announcement during Thursday’s opening-night performance at the Mockingbird on Main, and their latest stage piece Random Access Morons was immediately funny – in the best, most bizarre way possible. The 90 minutes that followed kept up that same energy.

If you’re looking for a sentimental story that slowly sneaks up on you, might I suggest The Christmas Letter Writing Club at the Playcrafters Barn Theatre?

Leaving Iowa, the winning comedy currently running at the Richmond Hill Barn Theatre, follows Don (played by Kevin Babbitt), a middle-aged writer who reflects on vacations from his youth. In the play's present, Don travels across the cornfield states to spread his father’s ashes at his childhood home. And in a series of flashbacks, Don and his family find themselves in interesting situations with zany characters during their Midwest road trips.

During Thursday's opening-night performance and area premiere of Ride the Cyclone, Ryan J. Hurdle’s character Ricky stops at one point in his song “Space Age Bachelor Man” and says, “It gets weird now.” But oh, gentle readers, that ship sailed from the moment the lights went down.

A heckuva lot of talented people put this production together; see it now, while the duck's still in the pond.

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